Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on Jobs

Clinton and Trump have distinctive plans to bring back jobs

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump shared their views on what it will take to create new jobs during last night’s presidential debate.

Last night Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump faced off in their final presidential debate. Jobs and the candidate’s plans for creating them were one of the hot topics discussed.

Like most issues, Clinton and Trump have two different views on what it will take to bring jobs back to the U.S.  Since it can be hard to hear through all the name calling and low blows we decided to break down each candidate’s ideas for job growth.

To keep things civil we’ll lay out the former first lady’s plans first.

Hillary Clinton’s Jobs Plan

Mission:  Making the Largest Investment in Good-Paying Jobs Since World War II

# Jobs created:  10.4 million jobs in the first term alone

The Plan:  

Throughout her campaign Clinton has promised to invest in the country’s youth as well as education.  Beginning with a $20 billion initiative Clinton is aiming to create new jobs specifically for millenials.  Within the initiative lies a $1,500 tax credit for employers that create apprenticeships. This credit will increase for employers that bring on young adults.

Clinton believes that student debt is preventing millenials from contributing to our economy.  She is committing to create a program that lets anyone with a college loan to refinance and enroll in income-based repayments.  She’s also pledging to make community college free, while enabling working families to continue their education with free tuition at public four-year-colleges.

Clean energy is also a priority for Clinton.  She vows to install half a billion solar panels by the end of her first term.  If she can set out to achieve these goals, there will be jobs created in the renewable energy sector.

She wants to do more to support small business. While her website points out that she is to “cut taxes, reduce red tape, and support innovation so that small businesses can grow and hire,” it’s not entirely clear how she will do this.  Though, It’s worth noting she wants young entrepreneurs to be able to defer their loans without payments or interest for up to three years to help them get their businesses off the ground.

Supporting scientific research and technological innovation are also on the agenda for the former Secretary. Clinton believes new industries will be created by investing in the two.

America’s infrastructure is another area Clinton wants to invest in. The repairing of roads, bridges, and schools, for example, will create jobs in a variety of industries.

Last but not least, Clinton wants to invest in American manufacturing.  She plans on encouraging U.S. companies to keep jobs on our soil by charging companies that move overseas an “exit tax”. She also wants to enforce companies to “pay us back” when they take tax breaks as well as hire overseas workers. 

On the subject of trade, Clinton wants to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership as it does not put U.S. job creation first.

While Clinton’s well rounded jobs plan sounds promising, it does come at a cost. How will she pay for this elaborate plan exactly?  Tax hikes on the wealthy. For example, Clinton’s proposed tax plan includes a new tax bracket for those making $5 million and over.

Critics of her tax plan have some serious concerns.  They fear her proposal to raise the business investment tax rates will kill jobs, reduce wages and hurt the economy. 

But whether you agree with Clinton’s jobs plan or not, any tax plan changes must get passed by Congress.  Which leads us to…

Donald Trump’s Jobs Plan

Mission:  To be the Greatest Jobs President God Ever Created

# Jobs Created:   25 million in next decade

The Plan:

Donald Trump’s job creation plan is based on his pro-growth economic policy.  It begins with a completely revised tax plan that cuts rates for everyone.  Trump proposes that the current seven tax brackets be reduced to just three with anyone making $29,000 a year or less paying nothing at all.

His tax plan also includes a lowering of the business tax.   Trump believes companies will want to keep business in the U.S. by reducing the business tax rate from 35% to 15%.

More elements of Trump’s tax plan include the closing of special interest tax breaks, the elimination of the carried interest loophole for Wall Street and a child care deduction.

The reform of government regulations is another component of Trump’s plan to bring back jobs.  He wants agency and department heads to identify all job killing regulations.  Any that are not compelled by Congress or public safety will be removed.

To be specific, Trump gives examples such as the Waters of The U.S. Rule and the EPA’s Clean Power Plan.  Both would be wiped out under Trump’s presidency.

Trump is pledging an America-first trade policy.  He believes the fastest way to bring back America’s lost manufacturing jobs is to renegotiate our current trade deals.   For example, he is adamant about renegotiating NAFTA and wants to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership entirely.  

Trump has also been extremely vocal about putting an end to the abuse of trade agreements.  He will have China labeled as a currency manipulator.  In the event China does not stop its illegal trade activities, Trump will use every lawful presidential power to resolve trade disputes and apply tariffs.

The final piece of Trump’s jobs plan revolves around energy production.  Trump wants the U.S. to not only be energy independent, but become the world’s leader in this field.  He wants to lift current restrictions on all sources of energy including coal and onshore and offshore oil and gas.

Trump will also support hydraulic fracturing, and allow energy production on federal lands. By lifting the existing energy restrictions, Trump estimates over 500,000 new jobs will be added annually.

With vastly different views from his opponent, Trump’s plans to reform tax, trade, energy and regulatory policies are his plans to create new jobs. The Trump campaign’s economist estimates that the economy will see a boost under his plan, ultimately creating 25 million jobs over the next decade.

However, critics of the dubbed “Trump Economy” fear that while he may create jobs in the short-term, the federal debt created from his tax plan could slow job-creation down over the next decade.

Remember, any changes to tax policy have to get passed through Congress.  While the subject of Congress passing laws is a controversial one, it is important to stay informed on who’s running for the Senate and what they stand for.  After all, the Congressional election is on November 6th as well.  If you’re unsure as to whether Clinton or Trump can produce jobs, you still have the power to vote for your congressman or congresswoman!

 Editor’s Note:  This article contains the highlights of each of the candidate’s jobs plans.  You can find their full plans for job creation on their campaign websites.

Sources:  https://www.hillaryclinton.com/briefing/factsheets/2016/08/08/hillary-clintons-jobs-plan-for-millennials/









Presidential debate stirs up heated response on social media over job creation ideas

whitehouseThe Internet’s abuzz today with social media reactions to last night’s first presidential debate. The event spurred the “most tweeted debate ever” for Twitter according to spokesman Nick Pacilio.  Andy Stone, a spokesman for Facebook said the debate generated 73.8 million likes, posts, comments and shares.

While many comments were focused on the issues of taxes, ISIS, the economy, and crime, we found a lot of uncommon ground on the subject of job creation.

In fact, our timeline began blowing up with a bevy of mixed reactions just seconds after asking  fans who they thought would bring more jobs back to the U.S.

First came swings from Trump supporters:




But then we heard from Hillary supporters:



comment-7                                                   The post also sparked several side conversations:




In the end, an overwhelming majority of respondents favored Trump’s ideas for job creation. And for the undecided few, they’re leaving it up to us, and of course, the Gods.





The Top 10 Companies Hiring Like Crazy in September

workIf you’ve been waiting for the summer to end before getting serious about your job search, the wait is now over.  Summer has unofficially ended and we’re seeing a ton of job posting activity on Job.com. In fact, we’ve found jobs in a variety of industries. Check out our top 10 employers hiring this month below:

1. Healthcare Employment Network – All RN specialties needed! Check out listings in your location now.

2. Parallon – This company provides business and operational services for hospitals and other medical institutions. Jobs range from project management to scheduling, and supply chain to customer service.

3. United States Army – The U.S. army offers a wide range of job opportunities for both military and civilian personnel.

4. Pizza Hut – Got restaurant industry experience? Check out Pizza Hut listings near you.

5. Compass Group – Compass Group provides food service and additional support services for restaurants, corporate cafes, hospitals, schools, arenas, and museums. They are in need of chefs, managers, marketers, and more.

6. Randstad – Randstad is one of the largest staffing organizations in the United States. They provide temporary, temp-to-hire and permanent placement services.  Check out their job openings and see if there’s an opportunity for you.

7. McDonald’s – The company behind the golden arches is looking for all types of employees from line cooks to general managers. Submit your McApplication today!

8. Home Depot – Retail is booming this time of year. With fall just around the corner, Home Depot is staffing up to prepare for all those homeowner’s hitting the store for supplies to winterize their home.

9. UnitedHealth Group – Best known for their health care coverage, UnitedHealth Group is not only hiring Healthcare Consultants (with the option to telecommute) but also a variety of business and administrative positions. You should check them out.  We bet they have a killer benefits package!

10. Best Version Media – Best Version Media publishes community focused magazines across the U.S. They are continually growing and have earned a number of awards throughout 2016 alone. The majority of their jobs are within the sales arena.

This Week’s Job Search Trends

trendingThe Job search market is heating up this week in the southwest.
However, we’re still seeing job seekers in all corners of the
country in pursuit of an all-american job. After doing a little
digging in Google Trends, we’ve identified the most popular job-related search terms
along with the regions with the most active job seekers. Check out
our list below.

Top 5 Job Search Terms

  1. USA Jobs – Maybe all 121 Medals won at the Olympics
    have job seekers chanting “U-S-A”. Or perhaps the upcoming Labor Day
    holiday is encouraging people to pick up the pace on their job search.
    Whatever the reason, this was the #1 search term for this week. If
    this is what you’re seeking as well, sign up on AmericanJobs.com.  It’s the most patriotic job site on the web
  2. Jobs Near Me – Job Seekers today are savvier than ever. With the
    mobile usage on the rise, job searchers are leveraging mobile technology
    to find jobs fast. Looking for a job near you?  Start your search now.
  3. Government Jobs – is historically a trending job
    search term. And with a historical election season just around the corner,
    more and more citizens are likely to want to work for Uncle Sam.
  4. USPS Jobs – Job seekers interested in a job with the USPS know that now’s
    the time to start applying. While it’s not quite fall job search season
    many companies who see a spike in business during the holidays are starting
    to staff up right now.
  5. Work From Home Jobs –  From those who are embracing the gig economy, to
    stay-at-home parents that want some extra cash, the idea of working from
    home is indeed rising in popularity.

Top Job Search Regions

  1. Mississippi
  2. New Mexico
  3. Oklahoma
  4. West Virginia
  5. North Dakota
  6. Wyoming
  7. Arkansas
  8. Louisiana
  9. South Carolina
  10. Alabama
  11. North Carolina
  12. Alaska
  13. Virgnia
  14. Arizona
  15. Texas
  16. Maryland
  17. Tennessee
  18. Kentucky
  19. Kansas
  20. Nevada

Ready for a Career Upgrade? You May Already Have the Skills

hammerIf you’re a women looking for a more profitable and fulfilling line of work, you may want to consider a career in the skilled trades. Skilled trade jobs typically pay better than child care, accounting, and administrative work—some of the jobs women tend to gravitate toward. They also offer plenty of room for career advancement and don’t require a costly, time-consuming university degree. Women in conventionally female-dominated jobs often already have the skills needed to transition to higher paying positions in traditionally male-dominated fields like welding, HVAC, and electrical work.

Choosing a Skilled Trade
Consider your existing skill set when choosing a skilled trade. Women who work as packaging and filling machine operators in manufacturing, for instance, often have good hand-arm steadiness, manual dexterity, and the control precision needed to become welders. With welding training, they could upgrade from earning about $26,000 a year to a median $39,000 annually.

Getting Training
Trade schools offer training in welding, electrical wiring, plumbing, pipe fitting, HVAC work, and a host of other professions. It typically takes less than a year to complete a trade school program and the average cost is $33,000; this is significantly lower than the expense of going to a 4-year college or university, which could run you $127,000.

Selecting Your Career Path
Once you know what you want to do, take a moment to consider your future career path. HVAC technicians and electricians can, for instance, climb the ladder to become managers or engineers, respectively. Alternatively, you could opt to work for the Federal Government. The U.S. Government employed over 170,000 blue-collar workers in 2013, and they not only enjoyed great job security but also generous benefits and a median annual wage of over $50,000 a year.

Yet another career path to consider is working for an employer for a number of years and then striking out on your own to become a contractor, small business owner, or entrepreneur. As Tulsa Welding School points out in the below illustration, 15 percent of HVAC mechanics, 11 percent of electricians, and 7 percent of welders are self-employed.

Skilled trade jobs have much to offer women of all ages and walks of life. If you are a young woman who is choosing a career path for the first time or already have job experience but are looking for a better line of work, take some time to consider skilled trade job options and see which one may be right for you personally.

Job Tips & News – Your Weekly Round Up

Startup Stock Photos

The jobs are hot in these summer months

From an improving job market to talk of Google being the next big job board, this week’s round up is sure to leave you full of optimism and maybe even ice cream.

New Jobs Up By 287,000 in June

Non-farm jobs jumped by a surprisingly robust 287,000 in June, exceeding all but the most optimistic expectations. It was the second-largest jobs increase in a year and follows a month where new jobs grew by a paltry 11,000, down from an initial report of 38,000.

This morning’s report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also said that unemployment ticked up from 4.7 percent to 4.9 percent, in part due to an influx of workers — many of them new grads — joining the labor force.

Some of June’s increase is due to the end of a Verizon strike that idled 35,000 workers, which the government counted as lost jobs in May. On the other side of the ledger, June’s numbers don’t reflect any impact from Britain’s vote to exit the Economic Union, a result that rocked the world’s economic markets. Any effect there won’t be known until the government issues its report for July’s employment.

Still, June’s numbers will help calm fears of a stalling jobs market. Except for softness in the oil and gas industry, and a 9,400 drop in transportation and warehousing, all major sectors showed job growth. The leisure and hospitality sector and healthcare had the largest increases. Seasonal recreation increases accounted for 27,200 jobs and bars and restaurants added another 21,900 workers. Healthcare grew by 38,500 jobs.

The private sector accounted for 265,000 of the new jobs, well above what economists were expecting and better, even, than what ADP reported Thursday in its National Employment Report.

A CareerBuilder forecast for the rest of this year predicts the second half will look a lot like the first half in terms of job growth. Based on a survey of 2,153 hiring and HR managers, CareerBuilder says:

50 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent workers, on par with 49 percent last year
29 percent of employers plan to hire part-time employees, on par with 28 percent last year
32 percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers, down slightly from 34 percent last year.

For the current quarter, 34 percent of the surveyed employers reported they plan to add full-time, permanent headcount, the same that said that last year.

One difference between the coming six months and the prior, says the CareerBuilder report, will be higher wages. About 40 percent of employers said they will pay higher starting salaries to new employees brought on in the next six months; 20 percent will pay at least 5 percent more. Current employees, too, will get a boost; 53 percent of employers said they plan raises for all workers before the end of the year.

That echoes what the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics data suggests may be the start of a general wage increase, long expected by economists. In its June report, the BLS said, average hourly earnings for all employees on private non-farm payrolls increased 2 cents to $25.61, following a 6-cent increase in May. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 2.6 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 4 cents to $21.51 in June.

This article first appeared on EREMedia.com

The Sweetest cities in the world


More than 400 cities around the world share in the frozen fun.  See if your city is bringing treats to the streets.

U.S. & Canada

Albany, NY
Ann Arbor, MI
Asheville, NC
Atlanta, GA
Austin, TX
Baltimore, MD
Baton Rouge, LA
Beaumont, TX
Bellingham, WA
Birmingham, AL
Boise, ID
Boston, MA
Buffalo, NY
Central Atlantic Coast, FL
Charleston, SC
Charlotte, NC
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH
College Station, TX
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Dallas, TX
Delaware, MD
Denver, CO
Des Moines, IA
Detroit, MI
Edmonton, AB
El Paso, TX
Erie, PA
Fairfield County, CT
Fayetteville, NC
Fort Myers-Naples, FL
Gainesville, FL
Grand Rapids, MI
Hampton Roads, VA
Harrisburg, PA
Hartford County, CT
Honolulu, HI
Houston, TX
Indianapolis, IN
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Kitchener-Waterloo, ON
Lafayette, LA
Las Vegas, NV
Lawrence, KS
Lehigh Valley, PA
Little Rock, AR
London, ON
Los Angeles, CA
Louisville, KY
Madison, WI
Manhattan, KS
Maui, HI
Memphis, TN
Miami, FL
Milwaukee, WI
Minneapolis – St. Paul, MN
Mobile, AL
Montreal, QC
Myrtle Beach, SC
Nashville, TN
New Haven County, CT
New Jersey Shore
New Jersey
New London County, CT
New Orleans, LA
New York City, NY
Oklahoma City, OK
Omaha, NE
Orange County, CAOrlando, FL
Ottawa, ON
Pensacola, FL
Phoenix, AZ
Piedmont Triad, NC
Pittsburgh, PA
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Portsmouth, NH
Quebec City, QC
Raleigh-Durham, NC
Rhode Island
Richmond, VA
Sacramento, CA
Salt Lake City, UT
San Antonio, TX
San Diego, CA
San Francisco, CA
Sarasota, FL
Savannah-Hilton Head, GA
Seattle, WA
Spokane, WA
St Louis, MO
State College, PA
Tacoma, WA
Tallahassee, FL
Tampa Bay, FL
Topeka, KS
Toronto, ON
Utica, NY
Vancouver, WA
Washington, DC
Wichita, KS
Wilmington, NC

This announcement first appeared on Uber.com

Rumor Has It


Google’s getting in to the job board game. Listen. It’s blasphemy here at the Job to
overly push another job site. After all, why send our seekers elsewhere when they can
access jobs from over 30 different career sites right on Job.com? Over 4 million searchable jobs and counting. But this news is so juicy the blogosphere has blown up with posts all week, and I’m feeling like Selena Gomez and can’t keep my news to myself. I mean I could, but why would I want to?!

Here’s the Scoop

An industry vet alerted everyone of the news after conducting a Google search for “aviation jobs”.   The search results revealed job snippets listed above all standard search results. The snippet was extracted from the site Aviation Week. Annnnnd that’s all we know.
Ok so there’s a little more to the story than that. Approximately 10 years ago the search giant had a product called Google Base in which they provided classified listings for anyone with “jobs” or “rent”, for example, in their search. The catch was that the information was limited to whatever anyone had uploaded into Google directly. This manual process proved to be too daunting for users, ultimately leading to the product’s demise.

Google, How Do You Plead?

Google’s taking the 5th on this one. But we found out about this on
the Internet and you know anything you read on the Internet is most certainly true. My take:It’s likely Google is testing out a classified product for jobs. Bear in mind Google tests a lot of things that never see the light of the day so time shall tell.

Check out one of the many articles we were inundated with this week to learn more>>


Job Tips & News – Your Weekly Roundup

neourban hipster office desktop

Your Weekly Job Tips & News Roundup is Here

This week I decided to do things a bit differently.  It’s a “shake-up” of sorts in an effort to provide a handful of highlights and happenings in the employment and job market world. So without further ado, here are the selections for this week’s top tips and news:

5 Choices Every Job Seeker Makes

Job hunting today has changed. It’s time to discard preconceived ideas when you are deciding how to go about five aspects of your job search.

How you job hunt says a good deal about your character, inquisitiveness and personality. And, you’ll get different results when you stay up to date and carefully position yourself among your competitors. Are you thoughtful and proactive, or are you lazy and feel entitled? Do you want to be seen as a go-getter, or just one more person hoping to gain some consideration?

Here are five choices you make when applying to jobs, sometimes without even realizing that you are making them.

Buckshot applying to everything vs. a focused approach. Do you send your resume far and wide, just hoping that someone will respond? Or, do you send out just a relatively few well-researched and crafted applications?

Resume readers can spot a mass-mailed plea for consideration a mile away, and tend to treat these applicants the same way as you treat the never-ending junk mail that fills your mailbox. Even if you are well-qualified, this approach smacks of laziness. Once in a while it works, but most of the time you are wasting your time with this approach.

Don’t measure your job hunt by how many applications you submit, but rather by the quality of case you make for a position that is well-suited to your background, skills, achievements and capacity for future career growth.

When you take the time to do research on every employer you are serious about, and write a killer cover letter that marries the company’s needs to your capacities and achievements, you’ll turbocharge your chances for success!

Answering ads vs. using ads as primary research. The obvious strategy is to respond to ads on job boards, company sites and places like Indeed by just submitting your resume online. But then you enter the black hole of applicant tracking systems. The odds always favor the employer, making this a poor strategy without good results the vast majority of the time.

Instead, get smart and use these job ads as primary source information about where the jobs are. Then, find or cultivate contacts at the hiring companies and network your way into an interview.

Relying on your responsibilities vs. showing your stuff. Somehow you probably got it in your head that your resume is supposed to describe all of your responsibilities in your current and former positions. Statements that begin with “Responsible for” don’t do anything to show how you’ve handled your tasks.

Instead, stand out from the crowd by calling attention to the accomplishments you’ve attained. How has your company benefited, and what happened because you exercised your responsibilities in an exemplary way? Resumes that show these things tend to get the attention of hiring authorities!

Regurgitating your story vs. actively listening to an employer’s pain points. Often, job hunters feel that if they could only get someone to hear their story, they would get hired. And the stories tend to drone on, and on, and on. When you are networking, and especially when you are interviewing, it’s important to speak less and let the other person do more talking.

Remember to only share the points that will be salient for your listener, and keep your narratives short. The more you listen, the more you’ll learn what is important to the employer, and then you’ll be able to draw out from your arsenal of stories and achievements the things that will be most relevant to sate his or her curiosity and advance your chances of favorable consideration.

Telling what you need vs. showing what you are worth. Of course you know your monthly expenses and understand how much money you need to survive, and you should strive to gain an income equal or greater than that amount. But this is not of concern to an employer, nor should it be.

It is important to understand your own value in the current marketplace. You can learn a great deal about that by consulting sites like Salary.com, SalaryExpert, Glassdoor and others. Then, talk about your salary expectations from the perspective of what’s fair, given objective criteria rather than just pulling random (or not so random) numbers out of the air.

Often, employers will look to give you the average salary to start out with, but this is the time when you can politely ask, “If you think I have great value for your team and won’t just be an average employee, why are you not reflecting that based on the salary scales for this role or industry?”

And then, just listen.

There may be a good and valid reason for an average offer, or you might just have made your case for a better-than-average rate of compensation.

Happy hunting!

This article first appeared on U.S. News & World Report


5 Parental Leave Trends You Need to Know


You already know about the so-called “arms race” in which companies are upping the ante on parental leave plans and other family-friendly benefits in an effort to recruit and retain today’s top talent. And you’ve seen the headlines – hardly a week goes by, it seems, without another company announcing an expanded maternity or paternity leave plan.

With so much noise it can be hard to keep track of the trends. With that in mind, here’s a look at some of the latest parental leave trends that you need to know about.

Crowdfunding maternity leave is a thing now

File this under “It has to be 2016 to be believed.” Publications from BuzzFeed to Scary Mommy to the Washington Post are reporting on a slightly depressing trend spreading in which moms are crowdfunding in order to have some financial security after giving birth. You know, because the United States doesn’t have a policy mandating paid leave for new moms after the birth of a child and only 12% of private sector employees have access to any kind of paid parental leave.

According to the Washington Post article, a GoFundMe search of “maternity leave” turns up about 1,500 results. The “TODAY” show reported there are about 6,000 campaigns with “maternity leave” or “child care.” Sounds crazy, but is it really? Almost a quarter of new moms return to work within two weeks of giving birth – largely due to financial pressures. And we know child care is the largest household expense for American families. It’s common to see stories of support pouring in for families who use crowdfunding sites to cover bills after a hospital stay or unexpected event. Given the state of parental leave in the United States, is crowdfunding maternity leave really all that different?

More dads want to take their leave

We’ve called it “The Zuckerberg Effect.” But really it’s another sign of the changing times. Modern dads want to – and, often, need to – be more involved in caregiving than past generations. And that starts with taking paternity leave. So it’s not surprising that 89% of fathers say it’s important for a company to offer paternity leave.

Working is reality for today’s parents. More than 90% of dads and more than 70% of moms work outside the home. Research has shown that when new fathers take paternity leave, there are long-term positive effects on his child and his partner. The trouble is that prevailing corporate culture has not yet caught up to these changes. Even as more dads want to take their leave, many are afraid to take time off out of fear of appearing less committed to their jobs and hurting their careers. You can read Care@Work VP and GM Michael Marty’s take on this type of “dad-shaming” on Fortune.

Companies with gender-neutral leave policies

Earlier this year, Etsy got a whole lotta love here and across the internets for unveiling an upgraded 26-week parental leave policy that was flexible, gender-neutral and lauded as “basically perfect.” Before Etsy, Netflix rolled out an “unlimited” maternity and paternity leave policy for new parents. In April, Twitter announced it was increasing its parental leave policy to 20 weeks of paid leave for all new parents.

Momentum building?

US and Papua New Guinea – we share the dubious distinction of being the only nations without a federal policy providing paid leave for new moms after the birth of a child. More than 70 countries also mandate paid leave for new dads. Not a great look for a global economic leader. The good news is there’s momentum building in support of paid leave legislation, like the FAMILY Act, for example. New York recently became the fourth state to mandate paid family leave, following California, Rhode Island and New Jersey. (Washington state passed one, too, but hasn’t done anything with it.) Many cities – from Austin to Boston to Washington, DC – have also passed paid leave policies, and San Francisco recently one-upped the state mandate and passed a law requiring employers to provide fully-paid parental leave.

Placing a premium on post-leave support

It’s true that the lack of a national parental leave policy for new moms (and dads) leads to a focus on employers who offer generous maternity leave and paternity leave programs. But we’re beginning to see leading companies invest in supports for working parents once they return to work. The “flying nannies” of Wall Street are an extreme example, but hundreds of great places to work also provide employee benefits like backup care, child care resource and referral and flexible work arrangements that have less flash but more substance.

Why are these types of family care benefits so important? Let’s take a quick look at some staggering statistics:

  • 70% of parents said the cost of child care has influenced their career decisions, according to this Cost of Care survey
  • 90% of employees have left work, and 30% cut back by more than 6 hours per week, due to family responsibilities, according to care@work’s Better Benefits survey.
  • 89% of working parents want family care benefits, but 81% say their employers don’t offer any.
  • 58% of working millennial moms told Pew Research being a working mom makes it harder to get ahead at work

Parental leave is the poster child of family-friendly workplaces, but it’s only one element of a comprehensive solution. When faced with the reality that in most modern families all parents work, more and more employers are realizing that investing in family-care benefits is a competitive advantage.

This article first appeared on the Care@Work blog


A Story from FBI Director James Comey’s time at Bridgewater perfectly Illustrates the hedge fund’s emphasis on ‘radical transparency’


FBI Director James Comey told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Thursday, on the subject of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified information, that he was “a big fan of transparency.”

When he was an executive at Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, from 2010 to 2013, he was enmeshed in a culture of “radical transparency” unlike that of any organization of its size.

In a new Politico article by Garrett M. Graff, Comey offers insight into his time at Ray Dalio’s hedge fund, including a strange scenario where a 25-year-old employee confronted him after a meeting. Graff writes:

“It was just weeks after he joined Bridgewater — whose corporate culture of high-achieving intellectuals resembles a moneyed management cult that shares more in common with the 1970s personal-improvement fad est than it does with a typical Wall Street firm — that Comey was cornered by a similarly new 25-year-old employee. The junior associate interrogated the former Justice Department official on a seemingly illogical stance that Comey had taken in an earlier meeting. ‘My initial reaction was “What? You, kid, are asking me that question?” … I was deputy attorney general of the United States; I was general counsel of a huge, huge company. No 25-year-old is going to ask me about my logic,’ he recalled. ‘Then I realized “I’m at Bridgewater.”‘”

Dalio founded Bridgewater from his apartment in 1975 but didn’t begin developing his intense management culture until the mid-1990s, he told Business Insider in March. He found that codifying his investment principles brought him success, and so he should do the same with the way he wanted his company run. It resulted in “Principles,” a manual of 210 lessons that all Bridgewater employees must learn.

Comey told Politico it took him three months to adjust to Bridgewater, at which point he appreciated the hardline culture. In a video testimonial on Bridgewater’s website, Comey said, “You combine that intelligence, the depth and the almost 360 [degree] vector of the questioning, there is no more demanding, probing, questioning environment in the world than Bridgewater.”

This article first appeared on Business Insider

The 5 Most Patriotic Industries

2AS2MYMJM9A sense of pride and celebration is ringing throughout our land as the anniversary of the birth of our country approaches.  In honor of the 4th of July, we’d like to take a glimpse in to our top 5 list of most patriotic jobs and industries:

1. The United States Armed Forces – With our President as Commander in
Chief and the Secretary of the Department of Defense (DoD) controlling each branch of the military, The United States Armed Forces tops off our list.
According to Forbes, the DoD has over 3.2 million employees making it the world’s largest “company”.

Fun fact: The People’s Liberation of China and Walmart come in at #2 and #3 respectively. However, we realize becoming a soldier, or working at Walmart for that matter, doesn’t interest everyone.  Keep in mind there are plenty of civilian opportunities available in the
DoD and military.

2. First Responders – These everyday heroes risk their lives regularly so our country can be a safer place. From firefighters, and law enforcement officers, to EMTs,
paramedics, and emergency room nurses, we simply can’t live without these individuals.

3. Politics – Many people get in to politics because they want to influence change in society.  Politicians are typically elected in to a position of leadership in the government to help make decisions on public policy.  Those who are truly patriotic have the public’s best interests at heart. They sacrifice countless hours serving the American people and protecting our freedom.

4. Education – Teachers have an incredibly strong impact on the young minds in our country. Their classrooms serve as a safe and sound environment for learning and they provide the tools and knowledge required to educate our youth. Just about everyone can look back on their school hood years and think of at least one teacher who had a positive influence on their life.  Teachers not only care for their current students, but for the adults they will become in the future.

5. Environmental Science – Environmental Science is one of the STEM subjects that has received major attention in recent years due to our nation’s reliance on technical and scientific advancements.  Environmental Scientists conduct research and apply science to protect the environment and human health. Similar to teachers, Environmental Scientists not only have an impact on the way we live and literally breathe today, but also influence how our land will be like many years down the road.

The Top States for Job Opportunities

mapWhen it comes to plentiful employment opportunities, we all know some areas are experiencing more job growth over others. We took a look at the top 10 states with the most jobs in our database and listed their top 3 cities in terms of job volume.

  1.  California – 280,000 total jobs
  2. Texas – 200,000 total jobs
  3. New York – 125,000 total jobs
  4. Florida – 135,000 total jobs
  5. Illinois – 143,000 total jobs
  6. Pennsylvania – 123,000 total jobs
  7. Ohio – 123,000 total jobs
  8. Virginia – 90,000 total jobs
  9. Georgia – 89,000 total jobs
  10. North Carolina – 84,000 total jobs