How to Job Search Like a Presidential Candidate

jobsearch2016Election season is over and we can all breathe a sigh of relief. Whether you loved or loathed the presidential candidates it’s fair to say they both gave their best efforts over the last 20 months. And while just one candidate gets to walk away victorious, a lot can be learned from the process.

Let’s take the candidates’ campaigns, for example. Both fought long and hard for what they believed in, never losing faith along the way. This is the kind of mindset needed for a successful job search as well.

Winning over America’s vote may be slightly more challenging than say, winning over a hiring manager but many of the same principles apply. Let’s review them shall we?

Do Your Homework

Whether you’re thinking about applying for a job or you’re about to enter the interview chair, you have to be “in the know.” No one wants to elect an uniformed president just as no one wants to hire a clueless job candidate. It’s important that you’re familiar with the company and up to speed on the trends and best practices that will help you succeed in the job.

Be Prepared…But Not Scripted

This is especially important during the interview. It’s never a good idea to shoot off the cuff without fully knowing the point you’re trying to make. As Donald Trump learned during the debates, you’re likely to get a better response if you have a well-thought-out plan. But, it’s also smart not to sound scripted. Hillary Clinton was heavily criticized on her robotic stature throughout the debates which kept her from connecting with her audience. While practicing your interview points will help calm your nerves, never sound canned.

Highlight Your Strengths

When campaigning for presidency, candidates must always explain why they’re the best person for the job. The same goes for you. Whether it’s on your resume or during an interview, you should always lead with your strengths. But pointing out your skills and accomplishments isn’t enough. You’re competing for a job after all. If you can find an angle that highlights how your uniqueness makes you the best candidate for the role, you’re likely to win the job.

Use the Law of Large Numbers

It’s common knowledge that candidates hot on the campaign trail have to make as much contact with voters as humanly possible. The more hands they shake, the better their chances are at winning. Use the law of large numbers when applying to jobs. Yes it’s redundant. Yes it’s exhausting. And yes, it’s not for the faint of heart.

Be Resilient

If either one of the candidates gave up whenever they hit a bump in the road the election would have been forfeited a long time ago. Any good job worth having is worth working for. Realize that you may put a ton of time and effort in to applying for a job only to never hear a peep. You may also get as far as the fourth and final interview and then lose the job to someone else. If you begin your job search knowing there will be some rejection you can prepare yourself for the long and arduous road. By staying steadfast and positive , you will catch your break. It just takes time.

Be Social

Social Media has never been as prominent in a presidential race as it was this year. Trump was a clear winner when it came to having a social media presence but Clinton wasn’t too far behind. There are many advantages to using social media in your job search.

For example, TechCrunch recently reported that employers will soon begin promoting their jobs on Facebook. You can easily market yourself as employable by updating your profile with your past and present work experience. Just be aware of the shortfalls of the platforms and keep your posts clean.

Be Relevant

Living in the New Media age allows for us to receive and release information in real time. Just as social media has become an integral part of a presidential campaign, you should adopt all modern forms of the job search. While it’s likely you’re already using your phone to look for jobs, take it up a few notches.

There are plenty of mobile job search apps that let you apply to jobs directly from your phone. Increase your chances of standing out and speed up the application process by having a mobile optimized resume. Also take the time to set up a professional profile on LinkedIn. Many employers are now requesting this in the application process.

Build a Strong Network

Networking is one of the most discussed topics when it comes to finding a new job and for good reason. A strong network or support group can open the door for new opportunities, provide references and give guidance and advice. In Trump’s acceptance speech he humbly gave credit to his family and GOP allies that helped him get the win. By nurturing your network, you will find yourself with a group of individuals who help you succeed.

Be Honest

There’s no doubt that Hillary Clinton’s trustworthiness was an issue for her while campaigning. Trump too had his fair share of falsehoods. If you’re even considering lying on your resume to get a job just don’t do it. The stakes are high enough when you’re vying for a new position. Don’t risk burning bridges by forging your qualifications.

Be Yourself

If there’s anything to take away from this election process and the new President-Elect it’s that you don’t have to have the most experience. You don’t have to be the most articulate. But if you put in the work, surround yourself with smart and supportive people and above all, be uniquely you, you can accomplish anything.

 

 

Presidential debate stirs up heated response on social media over job creation ideas

whitehouseThe Internet’s abuzz today with social media reactions to last night’s first presidential debate. The event spurred the “most tweeted debate ever” for Twitter according to spokesman Nick Pacilio.  Andy Stone, a spokesman for Facebook said the debate generated 73.8 million likes, posts, comments and shares.

While many comments were focused on the issues of taxes, ISIS, the economy, and crime, we found a lot of uncommon ground on the subject of job creation.

In fact, our timeline began blowing up with a bevy of mixed reactions just seconds after asking  fans who they thought would bring more jobs back to the U.S.

First came swings from Trump supporters:

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But then we heard from Hillary supporters:

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comment-7                                                   The post also sparked several side conversations:

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In the end, an overwhelming majority of respondents favored Trump’s ideas for job creation. And for the undecided few, they’re leaving it up to us, and of course, the Gods.

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The Art of the Job Search – Digital and In-Person Networking

This week, we begin a new series entitled “The Art of the Job Search.” Each week, we will discuss topics job seekers face in their job hunt, and will provide some useful information for employers looking for their next hire as well. Our first installment in this new series will focus on networking – both digitally and in person.

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As you begin or continue your job search, you may be spending your time searching and applying for jobs that match your experience and ideal career goals. While these are important steps in any job search, building relationships with people in your preferred industries is also important. According to a report by U.S. News & World Report,* some statistics show as much as 80% of new hires were based off referrals within the company. In this digital era, job seekers and recruiters alike must capitalize on
both in-person and online networking opportunities to build those relationships.

These days, digital channels are great ways to reach new industry contacts and obtain networking advice before you meet face-to-face. With social media sites as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google+, you have the ability to search for hiring managers in companies you’re interested in and what events offer the opportunity to meet them.

Some quick tips for digital networking include:

  • Search for hiring managers and other key staff at a company’s social pages including their own website. Connect with hiring managers on as many channels as possible to build that relationship.
  • Be sure your resume includes any professional networking links, including LinkedIn and your professional blog if you have one.
  • Likewise, be sure to hyperlink your resume to your social networking sites. If you are not currently employed, let people know you’re looking through posts including your resume.
  • Complete all stages of each social media profile. For example, completed LinkedIn profiles appear higher in search engine results. These searches are another way hiring managers research a potential employee before meeting with them.
  • Join the conversation for your desired industries on Twitter’s industry chats and LinkedIn Groups. You not only stay on top of the latest industry news, but you will receive priceless tips from people working in your field. Your contributions to the group may be noticed by a hiring manager ready to meet you!

One of the goals of digital networking efforts is to land the face-to-face meeting with the industry contact. Some of the places to network include job fairs, Chamber of Commerce meetings, and industry events. Some great sites exist that may help you find industry events in your area, including Facebook, LinkedIn Groups, Eventful and MeetUp.

After you network in-person, it is best to always be the person who follows up. Never assume a contact will reach out to you. Instead, be proactive and ask for a business card or contact information, as well the method they prefer to stay in touch. After the meeting, be sure to send a follow up email or make a call to keep the communication flowing. Your contact may have spoken to a great many people at a single event, and this is a great way for your discussion to stay fresh in their memory.

As you control your digital presence and utilize more networking tools online, you will be set above the crowd, helping you land the coveted face-to-face meeting sooner!

* U.S. News & World Report, “Tips to Succeed With In-Person Networking,” January 2013

Photo credit: evenbrite.com

Job Boards – Still the Kings of Online Career Tools

ImageNow is the time to look for the job you want.

A recent statement by the Department of Labor* shows the U.S. job market experienced higher-than-expected growth so far in the first quarter of 2014. With more employers looking to fill positions, now is the time to begin or revive your job search. Job.com is here to be a resource for you in each step of the job searching process.

Job boards still rule the online career services market.

Job.com and other job boards are experiencing significant growth in people visiting the site and becoming registered members. Career services and development sites had over 64 million visitors in February.** In a joint survey conducted by Job.com and Beyond.com, 31% of Job.com users were unfamiliar with professional networking sites beyond job boards. When it comes to finding job listings, career advice and services, and learning more about educational opportunities, job boards are still king for job seekers and recruiters.

Job.com has all the tools to help you find the right job now.

Here are some ways to get the most from your Job.com account.

  • Put yourself in front of recruiters and employers advertising positions through job postings.  You can search for jobs by title, location, or both.
  • Find the hidden job market – those employers not currently advertising positions – by posting your resume. Employers search our resume database every day for potential candidates. Job.com offers a range of resume tools to help you create your resume and promote it with recruiters.
  • Sign up for email job alerts. We send you jobs that match your profile directly to your inbox.
  • Read The Job Blog and follow Job.com on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and LinkedIn for even more career tools and news.

*United States Department of Labor OPA News Release, March 7, 2014; “Statement of Labor Secretary Perez on February employment numbers”

** comScore Media Metrix, February 2014

 

picture credit: tnooz.com