6 Tips for Staying Sane During Your Job Search

You’ve updated and posted your resume, signed up for job alerts, and have consistently applied to jobs. Yet, you still haven’t landed your #NewJob2017. Don’t dismay. Our internet sources tell us that it takes roughly one month to find a job for every $10,000 of the paycheck you would like to earn. For example, if you were looking for a job that pays $50,000 a year your job search could take 5 months.

Below are some ways to help take away some of your job search pain and put your mind at ease:

1.  Take a Break

You don’t want to run the risk of job search burnout. Taking some time away from your job search to focus on things like your family, friends and health will help you appreciate all that’s good in your life in order to help lift your spirits.

2.  Simplify Things

no-tv

If you’re finding it difficult to make time for your job search perhaps you have too much going on in your life. Look to rid yourself of distractions like social media and TV which can suck up your free time fast. Also, see if you can delegate some of your household chores or at least save some for the weekend when you’re not so exhausted.

3.  Meditate

Meditation is a tried and true practice of many of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. From LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner to the incomparable Oprah Winfrey, it is difficult to deny the benefits of meditation. While there are many different methods, studies have shown that meditation can change your brain matter, reduce stress and help you make better decisions.

4.  Get Outside

“Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Sometimes, when you’re in a funk, all you need is just a change of scenery. Sure, winter isn’t the most pleasant of seasons to be outside if you dislike the cold and live in New England (we feel sorry for you) but it’s scientifically proven that being one with nature is an easy way to boost your mental and physical well-being.

5.  Get Exercise

Seeing the pattern here? Like being outside, there are endless mental and physical health benefits to getting your move on. Even if it’s just going for a 15-minute stroll, getting your blood flowing is imperative to feeling happy and healthy.

6. Treat Yourself

treat

Just because you need a new job doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself of happiness. Sure, you may not be able to afford eating out, or clothes shopping, or Netflix even, but you can still find enjoyment in some small things. Life is short and you shouldn’t hang on to the idea that you will cheer up as soon as you get a better gig. By finding peace throughout the rough patches builds character and makes you a stronger you in the end.

 

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14 Ways to Find a Job in February – #11 Will Surprise You

So it’s February and now’s about the time where 80% of us give up on our New Year’s resolutions.  Let’s not make that the case if you’ve resolved to find a new job in 2017.  In fact, if you’re still searching for a job you love, wouldn’t it be fitting to find it in February?

In honor of the upcoming Valentine’s Day holiday, we’re listing 14 ways for you to find a job you love in February.  From your run-of-the-mill job search methods to more out of the box ways, you’re sure to pick up a few new tactics to apply to your existing hunt.

1. Frequently Check Your Job Alerts

Checking your email job alerts is by far the easiest way to stay proactive in your job search. It literally takes less than a minute to pull up your email, open your job finder and scan over the newly posted jobs that match your search.  Fun fact:  Job.com has unique jobs from employers nationwide as well as aggregated jobs from the biggest boards on the web. So there’s no sense wasting your time with multiple job alerts.  Look no further than Job.com Job Finders in your email!

2.  Post Your Resume

Posting your resume to databases such as Job.com’s will instantly increase your exposure. Employers and recruiters alike pay a fee to search most resume databases.  Including your resume in the mix tells them you’re ready for hire.  If you don’t have a resume or need help cleaning yours up, check out the easy-to-build templates on Online Resume Builders.

3.  Contact a Recruiter

Most recruiters are free for job seekers so reaching out to one is a great way to learn about jobs that may not be on all the job boards.  The thing to keep in mind when researching recruiters in your area is to find one that specializes in placing candidates in your field.  Many recruitment firms focus solely on one or just a few industries.  If you’re a salesperson it doesn’t make sense to contact an IT recruiter unless you have experience in IT sales. There are also additional online services that help distribute your resume to multiple recruiters all in one go.  For example, ResumeZapper is a resume distribution service that does just that.

4.  Talk to a Friend

im-so-happy

Friends, neighbors, loved ones, they’re all eligible when it comes to hitting them up for job leads.  You never know who knows someone who’s hiring or is simply “in the know” when it comes to local job opportunities.  All you have to do is mention that you’re looking and to kindly ask that they keep an eye out for you.

5.  Check the Newspaper Classifieds.

Even though you may be thinking “newspapers are so 2000,” hear me out.  Employers today are still spending millions of dollars on advertising their jobs in the newspaper.  While most recruitment ads can be found online, the fact that they’re listed in the newspaper can mean a couple of things:  1.  The right candidates don’t use the Internet to search for jobs or 2.  The best candidates have yet to be found online.

Since many job seekers complain that submitting an application online feels like a black hole, applying through a newspaper ad can be much more transparent.  Many newspaper ads provide a phone number or an email address at the very least.  This gives you a point of contact for follow-up.

6.  Visit Company Career Pages

06-01-15_may-whistleblower-digest_compliance-meme

Most large businesses have a branded company career page.  You know, a place on their website that promotes their company and explains why everyone and their mother wants to work for them.  They’re usually complete with a mission statement, company values, and pictures of the company’s team building activities and work outings.  There’s also typically a job search function or link to their current job openings.  A great way to streamline your job search on company career sites is to come up with a list of all the major employers in your surrounding area and go down the line, Googling each one.

7.  Attend Networking Events

seal

I get it, attending networking events is NOT everyone’s favorite thing to do.  But it just may be necessary to finding the job opportunity of your dreams.  If you’re super shy or cringe at the idea of showing up at a function alone, summon a friend.  It’s likely they’d have something to gain from the experience as well.  Some ideas for finding networking events near you include “meet-and-mingles” which you can ID by joining industry groups on LinkedIn, networking websites such as Meetup and Eventbrite, and even Craigslist.  And just remember, networking events are created for, wait for it…networking!  So while you may be intimidated by so many strangers in one room, everyone is there for the same reason.  Don’t be embarrassed by putting yourself out there.  Just do it!

8. Attend Job Fairs

The slightly less scary and possibly faster approach to finding a job outside of networking is attending a job fair.  Job fairs can give you great practice marketing yourself in front of company recruiters and HR professionals.  They’re also great for getting free resume advice right on location.  While some companies interview candidates throughout the job fair, others are present simply to promote their employer brand.  Regardless, job fairs offer invaluable opportunities for your career.

9.  Get Promoted

We appreciate you spending so much time reading our posts and searching our jobs but a better job could be right under your nose.  Have you considered moving over to a different department or working your way up at the company you’re with now?  Many companies hire from within.  Some have robust career development programs.  And others end up in a bind and need a replacement employee fast.  Do some self exploring to understand if you’re qualified to do a different job at your company and if said job will make you happier. If there’s an opportunity, go after it.  It will be a heck of a lot easier interviewing for a company that already knows you than to have to prove yourself to one that doesn’t.

10.  Leverage Your Social Profiles

social-media-and-my-career

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that this tip is no longer a new age tactic.  It is common knowledge that hiring managers can and will search for you on Google, Facebook, LinkedIn and the likes in the event they find your resume interesting.  So what’s a job seeker to do?  The obvious, of course.  Clean up all your social profiles.  That means no controversial content:  No party pics, no offensive political posts and no negativity.  Employers want to hire happy people!

In addition to keeping it clean, make sure your profile is up-to-date with your current work status and accurate title.  And speaking of, leverage all of those coveted contacts of yours.  Social media isn’t just a gold mine of data for advertisers.  Review your connection’s job titles and places of work and message those who may know of an opportunity that’s right for you.

11.  Volunteer

If you can swing it, volunteering is an excellent way to get a job.  Aside from it complimenting the rest of your experience on your resume, you can actually acquire new skills and knowledge as a volunteer.  And if that’s not enough, a study by the Corporation for National and Community Service found that those who volunteered had a 27% better chance of finding a job than those who didn’t.

12.  Connect with Alumni

If you attended a college or university you should have access to some sort of alumni network. Many universities have local chapters all over the country and are great assets in the job hunt.  School pride runs deep and those involved in alumni networks are on a mission to help as many fellow alumnus as possible.  If you can’t seem to find an alumni chapter near you, LinkedIn is a great alternative where you can search professionals who went to the same school as you.

13.  Connect with Former Teachers

We all have that one favorite teacher who really left an impression on our lives. But did you make one on theirs?  This may sound way out on left field, but if you’re still living near your old school, it wouldn’t hurt to reach out to your former teachers to see if they can help.  When you’re in the job market, it’s best to leave no stone unturned.  The more people who can help you find a job, the better.  Besides, it’s usually not acceptable to include a former teacher as a reference in job applications.  But if you have one that thinks the world of you, it’s likely they’ll offer whatever help they can in finding you a job.

14.  Get Creative

billboard

When all else fails you just might have to get a little creative.  We’ve seen a variety of ‘extreme’ job search methods used by job seekers over the years. From Nina Mufleh’s online resume that earned her an interview with Airbnb, to Adam Pacitti’s billboard that received over 100 job offers, there’s no limit to the creativity that can be used to get the job you want and deserve.  Shoot, (pardon the upcoming pun), we even came across a photographer who sent out 400 action figures of himself just to make his work known.  My point is, if you’re passionate enough, you’re creative enough.  If you feel stuck in a rut and just need to be heard, try doing things differently.  You just might get the results you’re looking for.

Got any job search techniques we missed?  Add them in the comments below.  Like this article? Share if with your friends.  Thanks for reading!

Top Resume Tips for 2017

By Natalya Khaykis, ZipJob 

The way resumes are written has changed over the decades. The once widely accepted objective statement is now discouraged by most hiring managers. Resumes also need to be written and formatted to pass the Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) most employers use.

An ATS is a software that screens your resume before it’s ever seen by a human. It looks for keywords and other information that match what the employer is looking for. This has replaced the need of manually sorting through hundreds of resumes and has saved companies time and money.

The average corporate position in the United States receives an average of 250 resumes. We’ll show you the top 5 tips for your resume in 2017 which will help you kick-start your job search.

Top 5 Resume Tips for 2017

1.  Accomplishments Over Duties – One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make when writing a resume is simply listing out their job duties. With all that competition, you need to show the employer specific achievements where you went above and beyond.

For example, instead of saying:

“Managed the sales team to ensure sales quotas were met”

Go for something that’s more achievement based:

“Managed a sales team of 8 and developed new marketing campaigns which saw a 34% increase in sales”.

Doesn’t that sound so much better?

One of the best ways to catch the employer’s attention is to use quantifiable achievements. Hiring managers love to see numbers on a resume. It catches their attention and makes your experience look more believable and tangible.

2.  ATS Optimization – Most employers use an automated resume scanner called an Applicant Tracking System. These systems pull information from your resume and determine if you’re a good match for the position.

On average, 75% of resumes are weeded out and never seen by human eyes. The problem is that many candidates are qualified but their resume just isn’t optimized for the ATS.

So how do you optimize your resume?

The first thing you need to do is use a standard resume format. Avoid any fancy colors, graphs, tables, fonts and images which the ATS will have difficulty processing.

You also want to ensure you use the keywords the ATS is looking for. It looks for keywords that relate to the position or qualifications the position seeks. The best place to look for keywords is the job posting itself. Look at some relevant keywords from the job posting and incorporate them in your resume. You need to tell the ATS that you have the skills and qualifications needed for the job.

It’s also a good idea to have your resume reviewed to see how it does in an ATS.

3.  Ditch the Objective – The resume objective was once widely accepted and appeared on almost every resume, not anymore. The objective basically says “Hi, here is what I want out of this job and my career”.

The hiring manager or employer isn’t looking for what you want, but what they need and how you benefit them.

This is best expressed with a resume summary. The resume summary should be a bit about your background, skills and why you’re a great candidate for the position. You can check out this guide for writing a good resume summary.

4.  Skills – This is one of the most important sections job seekers leave off their resume. Your resume should have a “Skills” or “Qualifications” listed in short bullet points. This allows a hiring manager to quickly see relevant qualifications, and it’s also great for including relevant keywords for an ATS. You can easily tailor your resume for each position by swapping relevant keywords.

Here is an example of a skills section on a resume:

skills-on-resume

5.  Include a Cover Letter – There has been much debate as to whether cover letters are effective, or even read anymore. The answer is that it depends on the hiring manager but many still do put a lot of emphasis on a cover letter. The cover letter allows you to speak in a more conversational tone and tell the employer your qualifications and why you’d make a good fit for the position.

A well written cover letter would never hurt your chances of landing an interview, and it actually may be the deciding factor.

The best practices for writing a resume are always evolving. We now need to write resumes for both humans and machines. Keep these tips in mind when writing your resume and good luck with your job search!

Ready to get a resume that’s guaranteed to get past the ATS and in to the hiring manager’s hands?  Check out ZipJob!  ZipJob uses professional writers and technology to ensure your resume gets noticed.  Learn More.

Words of Wisdom: Inspiration for Your 2017 Job Search

live-intentionally-aaron-larson-one-love-ministries-vimeo-thumbnail-1Judging from all the headlines, Facebook posts and tweets 2016 has been a pretty rough year.  But rather than reflect on all the gory details, let’s look onward to 2017
with the promise and hope that we’ll be able to turn things around in a new year. That said, hope alone cannot change things. It can’t change who we are and it can’t change how we are. If we want to change we must take action. And in order to take action we need to be inspired.

While inspiration comes from many places, today we turn to the Holstee Manifesto. Much
greater than a mission statement, the Manifesto was created by three founders of a t-shirt company who not only wanted to put their definition of success and happiness in print, but wanted to share their positive intentions with the world.

It’s a highly relevant piece of work that can be applied to almost anything in your life, especially to your pursuit for a new job. It begins like this:

This is your life. Do what you love, and do it often. If you don’t like something, change it. If you don’t like your job, quit.  If you don’t have enough time, stop watching TV.

You can read the rest here. While we all have our own individual hopes, goals, wants, and dreams, we all share the same need for work. Work creates our livelihood. It ensures our well-being. No matter what goes on in the world around us, the one thing we can control is how we choose to spend our time working.

Here’s to a happy and successful New Year. We look forward to helping you find your #NewJob2017.  Search, apply, and prosper!

 

It’s Called a Life, Not a Life Sentence! How to Move Forward When You Feel Stuck

By Michaela Alexis, LinkedIn 

If I never let go of my first dream job, I’d still be a can of beans.

Don’t believe me? Here’s proof (no, I wasn’t being cheeky, my hand just moved as this was shot)! This was my very first day of my first marketing job, and I had to walk around a local market like this on Mardi Gras, handing out flyers.

Oh, and at one point, THIS was my dream job, too, when I worked as a bartender at a country bar!

I’ve worked in all sorts of jobs, from a grocery store clerk, professional bubble blower, Disney cast member, and a can of beans, to a legal studies teaching assistant and Marketing Director. Heck, I’ve even spent a few days cleaning carpets and urinals. I have had a spectrum of experiences, ranging from neat-o to nightmare-ish.

We all have to start somewhere. And for some, those experiences shape you, refine you, help you to become a kinder, more compassionate human being. You can talk about them (like I am right now) with humour, fondness, and a little bit of “What was I thinking???”

But what happens when you can’t let go? When you’ve settled into a career that should have been abandoned long ago, but you’re holding on for dear life in fear that you won’t find anything better, that you’re not worthy of your career dreams, or, worst of all, that you deserve unhappiness.

I have never been happier career-wise in my entire life. But not only did it take scrubbing toilets and dressing up as a can of beans to get to this place, it also took willingness to let go, move on, and trust in my abilities when the dream changed.

The most important thing I’ve learned over time is this:

There is nothing more excruciatingly painful than feeling trapped in a life that you’ve drifted into.

So, if it feels impossible to move forward, let’s tackle what’s going on behind those feelings, shall we? Here are the top 5 reasons why you are feeling stuck!

1) You don’t recognize that a career is a relationship, not a task separate from your being.

A career is a relationship. Most of us aren’t fortunate to find “the one” on the first try. It takes time and patience to figure out what your needs are as an employee. I know that I thought I’d love working in an open concept style office, but when I was actually put into that situation, I quickly realized how much I valued my privacy and peace.

The other issue I see popping up with my Linkedin connections is the belief that the culture will change. If the company doesn’t value its employees, if gossip and bullying is the norm, or if the job feels like you’re serving hard time, it’s not going to magically change tomorrow. Focus on the things that you can control, and start examining your wants and needs.

2) You are too busy to focus on what you actually need to

We, as a society, need to stop the glorification of “busy”. Being busy makes you feel important and valued while you’re in the zone, but ends up depleting you of the energy you need to build the life you want. It becomes a vicious, addictive cycle. I remember feeling like I just needed to do more to feel more. But, the only thing I ended up feeling was burnt out.

I would say that most people feel stuck because of this. Think about what happens when you don’t get enough sleep. Think about how hard to is to think clearly and make decisions. The same happens when you are constantly spending your energy in the wrong places. You can’t pour from an empty cup. If you want to take those important first steps, you need to put your mind and body at the very top of your to-do list.

I’ve never seen a tombstone that said “I wish I had written one more work email”. Time is a gift, so focus on what actually matters.

3) Your identity has become intertwined with your career

This is an easy trap for people that are perfectionists or just super passionate about their work, whatever it may be. I’m definitely guilty of this myself. I went to Carleton University for six years for a degree that should have taken four years. I was so wrapped up in the cocoon of being a student that I didn’t want to think about being anything else.

The reason that my Linkedin title doesn’t say “Marketing Manager at Grade A” is because I am acutely aware of how easy it is to mistake who you are for what you do. You are so much more than your job title, and moving on to a different career isn’t going to make you more or less YOU.

4) You feel like hating your job is better than being a “job hopper”

The stigma surrounding “job hopping” is straight up silly. Yes, of course, there are extreme examples of people that just can’t seem to get it together, but for the most part, “job hopping” is just “career experimenting”.

I come from a long line of “career experimenters” and I’m damn proud of it. My mom was a nun that traveled the world, helping in orphanages, before becoming an elementary school teacher and internationally competing as a Masters track and field athlete. My father was a radio DJ and used car salesman before immigrating to Canada and becoming a beloved family doctor. I’ve been blessed to grow up with two parents that truly found their purposes and loved their careers, but were beautifully messy in their journeys towards living their passions.

So if the job is making you miserable, stop obsessing over how it may look to recruiters and/or hiring managers. That can’t be your sole deciding factor. When I was laid off, I was only working at my last job for about 4 months. While, yes, it made me self-conscious, I knew that a resume could never fully capture my capabilities anyhow, and focused on proving that I deserved an awesome career. You are just as deserving!

5) We live in a fear-based culture where joblessness is a like a death sentence

I realized how deep feelings of scarcity were ingrained in me when I turned down four job offers before accepting the role with Grade A. Each time, I felt physically nauseous. I felt irresponsible, irrational, and ungrateful.

I had the student loans office calling me, and I barely had enough cash coming in from Employment Insurance to cover my groceries, gas and parking to get to interviews. For the first time ever, I couldn’t pay my rent on time and had to call my parents to loan me the money. As desperately as I wanted to throw up my hands and throw out my dream job wish list, I knew that my fear was directing me to where I needed to keep going. It was actually my compass.

It’s so easy to doubt your own capacity for awesomeness, to listen when well-meaning friends and family encourage you to stick it out because the job market is brutal. But why cheat yourself?

Stop waiting for the tide to change. You are the tide. You have absolutely everything that you need to create the life you deserve. At some point, you’ll need to decide whether to allow yourself to drift aimlessly and hope for the best, or strap on a life jacket and swim like hell towards the shoreline.

Read the original piece here.

How to Job Search Like a Presidential Candidate

jobsearch2016Election season is over and we can all breathe a sigh of relief. Whether you loved or loathed the presidential candidates it’s fair to say they both gave their best efforts over the last 20 months. And while just one candidate gets to walk away victorious, a lot can be learned from the process.

Let’s take the candidates’ campaigns, for example. Both fought long and hard for what they believed in, never losing faith along the way. This is the kind of mindset needed for a successful job search as well.

Winning over America’s vote may be slightly more challenging than say, winning over a hiring manager but many of the same principles apply. Let’s review them shall we?

Do Your Homework

Whether you’re thinking about applying for a job or you’re about to enter the interview chair, you have to be “in the know.” No one wants to elect an uniformed president just as no one wants to hire a clueless job candidate. It’s important that you’re familiar with the company and up to speed on the trends and best practices that will help you succeed in the job.

Be Prepared…But Not Scripted

This is especially important during the interview. It’s never a good idea to shoot off the cuff without fully knowing the point you’re trying to make. As Donald Trump learned during the debates, you’re likely to get a better response if you have a well-thought-out plan. But, it’s also smart not to sound scripted. Hillary Clinton was heavily criticized on her robotic stature throughout the debates which kept her from connecting with her audience. While practicing your interview points will help calm your nerves, never sound canned.

Highlight Your Strengths

When campaigning for presidency, candidates must always explain why they’re the best person for the job. The same goes for you. Whether it’s on your resume or during an interview, you should always lead with your strengths. But pointing out your skills and accomplishments isn’t enough. You’re competing for a job after all. If you can find an angle that highlights how your uniqueness makes you the best candidate for the role, you’re likely to win the job.

Use the Law of Large Numbers

It’s common knowledge that candidates hot on the campaign trail have to make as much contact with voters as humanly possible. The more hands they shake, the better their chances are at winning. Use the law of large numbers when applying to jobs. Yes it’s redundant. Yes it’s exhausting. And yes, it’s not for the faint of heart.

Be Resilient

If either one of the candidates gave up whenever they hit a bump in the road the election would have been forfeited a long time ago. Any good job worth having is worth working for. Realize that you may put a ton of time and effort in to applying for a job only to never hear a peep. You may also get as far as the fourth and final interview and then lose the job to someone else. If you begin your job search knowing there will be some rejection you can prepare yourself for the long and arduous road. By staying steadfast and positive , you will catch your break. It just takes time.

Be Social

Social Media has never been as prominent in a presidential race as it was this year. Trump was a clear winner when it came to having a social media presence but Clinton wasn’t too far behind. There are many advantages to using social media in your job search.

For example, TechCrunch recently reported that employers will soon begin promoting their jobs on Facebook. You can easily market yourself as employable by updating your profile with your past and present work experience. Just be aware of the shortfalls of the platforms and keep your posts clean.

Be Relevant

Living in the New Media age allows for us to receive and release information in real time. Just as social media has become an integral part of a presidential campaign, you should adopt all modern forms of the job search. While it’s likely you’re already using your phone to look for jobs, take it up a few notches.

There are plenty of mobile job search apps that let you apply to jobs directly from your phone. Increase your chances of standing out and speed up the application process by having a mobile optimized resume. Also take the time to set up a professional profile on LinkedIn. Many employers are now requesting this in the application process.

Build a Strong Network

Networking is one of the most discussed topics when it comes to finding a new job and for good reason. A strong network or support group can open the door for new opportunities, provide references and give guidance and advice. In Trump’s acceptance speech he humbly gave credit to his family and GOP allies that helped him get the win. By nurturing your network, you will find yourself with a group of individuals who help you succeed.

Be Honest

There’s no doubt that Hillary Clinton’s trustworthiness was an issue for her while campaigning. Trump too had his fair share of falsehoods. If you’re even considering lying on your resume to get a job just don’t do it. The stakes are high enough when you’re vying for a new position. Don’t risk burning bridges by forging your qualifications.

Be Yourself

If there’s anything to take away from this election process and the new President-Elect it’s that you don’t have to have the most experience. You don’t have to be the most articulate. But if you put in the work, surround yourself with smart and supportive people and above all, be uniquely you, you can accomplish anything.

 

 

The Top 10 Companies Hiring Like Crazy in September

workIf you’ve been waiting for the summer to end before getting serious about your job search, the wait is now over.  Summer has unofficially ended and we’re seeing a ton of job posting activity on Job.com. In fact, we’ve found jobs in a variety of industries. Check out our top 10 employers hiring this month below:

1. Healthcare Employment Network – All RN specialties needed! Check out listings in your location now.

2. Parallon – This company provides business and operational services for hospitals and other medical institutions. Jobs range from project management to scheduling, and supply chain to customer service.

3. United States Army – The U.S. army offers a wide range of job opportunities for both military and civilian personnel.

4. Pizza Hut – Got restaurant industry experience? Check out Pizza Hut listings near you.

5. Compass Group – Compass Group provides food service and additional support services for restaurants, corporate cafes, hospitals, schools, arenas, and museums. They are in need of chefs, managers, marketers, and more.

6. Randstad – Randstad is one of the largest staffing organizations in the United States. They provide temporary, temp-to-hire and permanent placement services.  Check out their job openings and see if there’s an opportunity for you.

7. McDonald’s – The company behind the golden arches is looking for all types of employees from line cooks to general managers. Submit your McApplication today!

8. Home Depot – Retail is booming this time of year. With fall just around the corner, Home Depot is staffing up to prepare for all those homeowner’s hitting the store for supplies to winterize their home.

9. UnitedHealth Group – Best known for their health care coverage, UnitedHealth Group is not only hiring Healthcare Consultants (with the option to telecommute) but also a variety of business and administrative positions. You should check them out.  We bet they have a killer benefits package!

10. Best Version Media – Best Version Media publishes community focused magazines across the U.S. They are continually growing and have earned a number of awards throughout 2016 alone. The majority of their jobs are within the sales arena.

This Week’s Job Search Trends

trendingThe Job search market is heating up this week in the southwest.
However, we’re still seeing job seekers in all corners of the
country in pursuit of an all-american job. After doing a little
digging in Google Trends, we’ve identified the most popular job-related search terms
along with the regions with the most active job seekers. Check out
our list below.

Top 5 Job Search Terms

  1. USA Jobs – Maybe all 121 Medals won at the Olympics
    have job seekers chanting “U-S-A”. Or perhaps the upcoming Labor Day
    holiday is encouraging people to pick up the pace on their job search.
    Whatever the reason, this was the #1 search term for this week. If
    this is what you’re seeking as well, sign up on AmericanJobs.com.  It’s the most patriotic job site on the web
  2. Jobs Near Me – Job Seekers today are savvier than ever. With the
    mobile usage on the rise, job searchers are leveraging mobile technology
    to find jobs fast. Looking for a job near you?  Start your search now.
  3. Government Jobs – is historically a trending job
    search term. And with a historical election season just around the corner,
    more and more citizens are likely to want to work for Uncle Sam.
  4. USPS Jobs – Job seekers interested in a job with the USPS know that now’s
    the time to start applying. While it’s not quite fall job search season
    many companies who see a spike in business during the holidays are starting
    to staff up right now.
  5. Work From Home Jobs –  From those who are embracing the gig economy, to
    stay-at-home parents that want some extra cash, the idea of working from
    home is indeed rising in popularity.

Top Job Search Regions

  1. Mississippi
  2. New Mexico
  3. Oklahoma
  4. West Virginia
  5. North Dakota
  6. Wyoming
  7. Arkansas
  8. Louisiana
  9. South Carolina
  10. Alabama
  11. North Carolina
  12. Alaska
  13. Virgnia
  14. Arizona
  15. Texas
  16. Maryland
  17. Tennessee
  18. Kentucky
  19. Kansas
  20. Nevada

Job Tips & News – Your Weekly Roundup

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Your Weekly Job Tips & News Roundup is Here

This week I decided to do things a bit differently.  It’s a “shake-up” of sorts in an effort to provide a handful of highlights and happenings in the employment and job market world. So without further ado, here are the selections for this week’s top tips and news:

5 Choices Every Job Seeker Makes

Job hunting today has changed. It’s time to discard preconceived ideas when you are deciding how to go about five aspects of your job search.

How you job hunt says a good deal about your character, inquisitiveness and personality. And, you’ll get different results when you stay up to date and carefully position yourself among your competitors. Are you thoughtful and proactive, or are you lazy and feel entitled? Do you want to be seen as a go-getter, or just one more person hoping to gain some consideration?

Here are five choices you make when applying to jobs, sometimes without even realizing that you are making them.

Buckshot applying to everything vs. a focused approach. Do you send your resume far and wide, just hoping that someone will respond? Or, do you send out just a relatively few well-researched and crafted applications?

Resume readers can spot a mass-mailed plea for consideration a mile away, and tend to treat these applicants the same way as you treat the never-ending junk mail that fills your mailbox. Even if you are well-qualified, this approach smacks of laziness. Once in a while it works, but most of the time you are wasting your time with this approach.

Don’t measure your job hunt by how many applications you submit, but rather by the quality of case you make for a position that is well-suited to your background, skills, achievements and capacity for future career growth.

When you take the time to do research on every employer you are serious about, and write a killer cover letter that marries the company’s needs to your capacities and achievements, you’ll turbocharge your chances for success!

Answering ads vs. using ads as primary research. The obvious strategy is to respond to ads on job boards, company sites and places like Indeed by just submitting your resume online. But then you enter the black hole of applicant tracking systems. The odds always favor the employer, making this a poor strategy without good results the vast majority of the time.

Instead, get smart and use these job ads as primary source information about where the jobs are. Then, find or cultivate contacts at the hiring companies and network your way into an interview.

Relying on your responsibilities vs. showing your stuff. Somehow you probably got it in your head that your resume is supposed to describe all of your responsibilities in your current and former positions. Statements that begin with “Responsible for” don’t do anything to show how you’ve handled your tasks.

Instead, stand out from the crowd by calling attention to the accomplishments you’ve attained. How has your company benefited, and what happened because you exercised your responsibilities in an exemplary way? Resumes that show these things tend to get the attention of hiring authorities!

Regurgitating your story vs. actively listening to an employer’s pain points. Often, job hunters feel that if they could only get someone to hear their story, they would get hired. And the stories tend to drone on, and on, and on. When you are networking, and especially when you are interviewing, it’s important to speak less and let the other person do more talking.

Remember to only share the points that will be salient for your listener, and keep your narratives short. The more you listen, the more you’ll learn what is important to the employer, and then you’ll be able to draw out from your arsenal of stories and achievements the things that will be most relevant to sate his or her curiosity and advance your chances of favorable consideration.

Telling what you need vs. showing what you are worth. Of course you know your monthly expenses and understand how much money you need to survive, and you should strive to gain an income equal or greater than that amount. But this is not of concern to an employer, nor should it be.

It is important to understand your own value in the current marketplace. You can learn a great deal about that by consulting sites like Salary.com, SalaryExpert, Glassdoor and others. Then, talk about your salary expectations from the perspective of what’s fair, given objective criteria rather than just pulling random (or not so random) numbers out of the air.

Often, employers will look to give you the average salary to start out with, but this is the time when you can politely ask, “If you think I have great value for your team and won’t just be an average employee, why are you not reflecting that based on the salary scales for this role or industry?”

And then, just listen.

There may be a good and valid reason for an average offer, or you might just have made your case for a better-than-average rate of compensation.

Happy hunting!

This article first appeared on U.S. News & World Report

 

5 Parental Leave Trends You Need to Know

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You already know about the so-called “arms race” in which companies are upping the ante on parental leave plans and other family-friendly benefits in an effort to recruit and retain today’s top talent. And you’ve seen the headlines – hardly a week goes by, it seems, without another company announcing an expanded maternity or paternity leave plan.

With so much noise it can be hard to keep track of the trends. With that in mind, here’s a look at some of the latest parental leave trends that you need to know about.

Crowdfunding maternity leave is a thing now

File this under “It has to be 2016 to be believed.” Publications from BuzzFeed to Scary Mommy to the Washington Post are reporting on a slightly depressing trend spreading in which moms are crowdfunding in order to have some financial security after giving birth. You know, because the United States doesn’t have a policy mandating paid leave for new moms after the birth of a child and only 12% of private sector employees have access to any kind of paid parental leave.

According to the Washington Post article, a GoFundMe search of “maternity leave” turns up about 1,500 results. The “TODAY” show reported there are about 6,000 campaigns with “maternity leave” or “child care.” Sounds crazy, but is it really? Almost a quarter of new moms return to work within two weeks of giving birth – largely due to financial pressures. And we know child care is the largest household expense for American families. It’s common to see stories of support pouring in for families who use crowdfunding sites to cover bills after a hospital stay or unexpected event. Given the state of parental leave in the United States, is crowdfunding maternity leave really all that different?

More dads want to take their leave

We’ve called it “The Zuckerberg Effect.” But really it’s another sign of the changing times. Modern dads want to – and, often, need to – be more involved in caregiving than past generations. And that starts with taking paternity leave. So it’s not surprising that 89% of fathers say it’s important for a company to offer paternity leave.

Working is reality for today’s parents. More than 90% of dads and more than 70% of moms work outside the home. Research has shown that when new fathers take paternity leave, there are long-term positive effects on his child and his partner. The trouble is that prevailing corporate culture has not yet caught up to these changes. Even as more dads want to take their leave, many are afraid to take time off out of fear of appearing less committed to their jobs and hurting their careers. You can read Care@Work VP and GM Michael Marty’s take on this type of “dad-shaming” on Fortune.

Companies with gender-neutral leave policies

Earlier this year, Etsy got a whole lotta love here and across the internets for unveiling an upgraded 26-week parental leave policy that was flexible, gender-neutral and lauded as “basically perfect.” Before Etsy, Netflix rolled out an “unlimited” maternity and paternity leave policy for new parents. In April, Twitter announced it was increasing its parental leave policy to 20 weeks of paid leave for all new parents.

Momentum building?

US and Papua New Guinea – we share the dubious distinction of being the only nations without a federal policy providing paid leave for new moms after the birth of a child. More than 70 countries also mandate paid leave for new dads. Not a great look for a global economic leader. The good news is there’s momentum building in support of paid leave legislation, like the FAMILY Act, for example. New York recently became the fourth state to mandate paid family leave, following California, Rhode Island and New Jersey. (Washington state passed one, too, but hasn’t done anything with it.) Many cities – from Austin to Boston to Washington, DC – have also passed paid leave policies, and San Francisco recently one-upped the state mandate and passed a law requiring employers to provide fully-paid parental leave.

Placing a premium on post-leave support

It’s true that the lack of a national parental leave policy for new moms (and dads) leads to a focus on employers who offer generous maternity leave and paternity leave programs. But we’re beginning to see leading companies invest in supports for working parents once they return to work. The “flying nannies” of Wall Street are an extreme example, but hundreds of great places to work also provide employee benefits like backup care, child care resource and referral and flexible work arrangements that have less flash but more substance.

Why are these types of family care benefits so important? Let’s take a quick look at some staggering statistics:

  • 70% of parents said the cost of child care has influenced their career decisions, according to this Cost of Care survey
  • 90% of employees have left work, and 30% cut back by more than 6 hours per week, due to family responsibilities, according to care@work’s Better Benefits survey.
  • 89% of working parents want family care benefits, but 81% say their employers don’t offer any.
  • 58% of working millennial moms told Pew Research being a working mom makes it harder to get ahead at work

Parental leave is the poster child of family-friendly workplaces, but it’s only one element of a comprehensive solution. When faced with the reality that in most modern families all parents work, more and more employers are realizing that investing in family-care benefits is a competitive advantage.

This article first appeared on the Care@Work blog

 

A Story from FBI Director James Comey’s time at Bridgewater perfectly Illustrates the hedge fund’s emphasis on ‘radical transparency’

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FBI Director James Comey told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Thursday, on the subject of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified information, that he was “a big fan of transparency.”

When he was an executive at Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, from 2010 to 2013, he was enmeshed in a culture of “radical transparency” unlike that of any organization of its size.

In a new Politico article by Garrett M. Graff, Comey offers insight into his time at Ray Dalio’s hedge fund, including a strange scenario where a 25-year-old employee confronted him after a meeting. Graff writes:

“It was just weeks after he joined Bridgewater — whose corporate culture of high-achieving intellectuals resembles a moneyed management cult that shares more in common with the 1970s personal-improvement fad est than it does with a typical Wall Street firm — that Comey was cornered by a similarly new 25-year-old employee. The junior associate interrogated the former Justice Department official on a seemingly illogical stance that Comey had taken in an earlier meeting. ‘My initial reaction was “What? You, kid, are asking me that question?” … I was deputy attorney general of the United States; I was general counsel of a huge, huge company. No 25-year-old is going to ask me about my logic,’ he recalled. ‘Then I realized “I’m at Bridgewater.”‘”

Dalio founded Bridgewater from his apartment in 1975 but didn’t begin developing his intense management culture until the mid-1990s, he told Business Insider in March. He found that codifying his investment principles brought him success, and so he should do the same with the way he wanted his company run. It resulted in “Principles,” a manual of 210 lessons that all Bridgewater employees must learn.

Comey told Politico it took him three months to adjust to Bridgewater, at which point he appreciated the hardline culture. In a video testimonial on Bridgewater’s website, Comey said, “You combine that intelligence, the depth and the almost 360 [degree] vector of the questioning, there is no more demanding, probing, questioning environment in the world than Bridgewater.”

This article first appeared on Business Insider