14 Ways to Find a Job in February – #11 Will Surprise You

So it’s February and now’s about the time where 80% of us give up on our New Year’s resolutions.  Let’s not make that the case if you’ve resolved to find a new job in 2017.  In fact, if you’re still searching for a job you love, wouldn’t it be fitting to find it in February?

In honor of the upcoming Valentine’s Day holiday, we’re listing 14 ways for you to find a job you love in February.  From your run-of-the-mill job search methods to more out of the box ways, you’re sure to pick up a few new tactics to apply to your existing hunt.

1. Frequently Check Your Job Alerts

Checking your email job alerts is by far the easiest way to stay proactive in your job search. It literally takes less than a minute to pull up your email, open your job finder and scan over the newly posted jobs that match your search.  Fun fact:  Job.com has unique jobs from employers nationwide as well as aggregated jobs from the biggest boards on the web. So there’s no sense wasting your time with multiple job alerts.  Look no further than Job.com Job Finders in your email!

2.  Post Your Resume

Posting your resume to databases such as Job.com’s will instantly increase your exposure. Employers and recruiters alike pay a fee to search most resume databases.  Including your resume in the mix tells them you’re ready for hire.  If you don’t have a resume or need help cleaning yours up, check out the easy-to-build templates on Online Resume Builders.

3.  Contact a Recruiter

Most recruiters are free for job seekers so reaching out to one is a great way to learn about jobs that may not be on all the job boards.  The thing to keep in mind when researching recruiters in your area is to find one that specializes in placing candidates in your field.  Many recruitment firms focus solely on one or just a few industries.  If you’re a salesperson it doesn’t make sense to contact an IT recruiter unless you have experience in IT sales. There are also additional online services that help distribute your resume to multiple recruiters all in one go.  For example, ResumeZapper is a resume distribution service that does just that.

4.  Talk to a Friend

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Friends, neighbors, loved ones, they’re all eligible when it comes to hitting them up for job leads.  You never know who knows someone who’s hiring or is simply “in the know” when it comes to local job opportunities.  All you have to do is mention that you’re looking and to kindly ask that they keep an eye out for you.

5.  Check the Newspaper Classifieds.

Even though you may be thinking “newspapers are so 2000,” hear me out.  Employers today are still spending millions of dollars on advertising their jobs in the newspaper.  While most recruitment ads can be found online, the fact that they’re listed in the newspaper can mean a couple of things:  1.  The right candidates don’t use the Internet to search for jobs or 2.  The best candidates have yet to be found online.

Since many job seekers complain that submitting an application online feels like a black hole, applying through a newspaper ad can be much more transparent.  Many newspaper ads provide a phone number or an email address at the very least.  This gives you a point of contact for follow-up.

6.  Visit Company Career Pages

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Most large businesses have a branded company career page.  You know, a place on their website that promotes their company and explains why everyone and their mother wants to work for them.  They’re usually complete with a mission statement, company values, and pictures of the company’s team building activities and work outings.  There’s also typically a job search function or link to their current job openings.  A great way to streamline your job search on company career sites is to come up with a list of all the major employers in your surrounding area and go down the line, Googling each one.

7.  Attend Networking Events

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I get it, attending networking events is NOT everyone’s favorite thing to do.  But it just may be necessary to finding the job opportunity of your dreams.  If you’re super shy or cringe at the idea of showing up at a function alone, summon a friend.  It’s likely they’d have something to gain from the experience as well.  Some ideas for finding networking events near you include “meet-and-mingles” which you can ID by joining industry groups on LinkedIn, networking websites such as Meetup and Eventbrite, and even Craigslist.  And just remember, networking events are created for, wait for it…networking!  So while you may be intimidated by so many strangers in one room, everyone is there for the same reason.  Don’t be embarrassed by putting yourself out there.  Just do it!

8. Attend Job Fairs

The slightly less scary and possibly faster approach to finding a job outside of networking is attending a job fair.  Job fairs can give you great practice marketing yourself in front of company recruiters and HR professionals.  They’re also great for getting free resume advice right on location.  While some companies interview candidates throughout the job fair, others are present simply to promote their employer brand.  Regardless, job fairs offer invaluable opportunities for your career.

9.  Get Promoted

We appreciate you spending so much time reading our posts and searching our jobs but a better job could be right under your nose.  Have you considered moving over to a different department or working your way up at the company you’re with now?  Many companies hire from within.  Some have robust career development programs.  And others end up in a bind and need a replacement employee fast.  Do some self exploring to understand if you’re qualified to do a different job at your company and if said job will make you happier. If there’s an opportunity, go after it.  It will be a heck of a lot easier interviewing for a company that already knows you than to have to prove yourself to one that doesn’t.

10.  Leverage Your Social Profiles

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It shouldn’t come as a surprise that this tip is no longer a new age tactic.  It is common knowledge that hiring managers can and will search for you on Google, Facebook, LinkedIn and the likes in the event they find your resume interesting.  So what’s a job seeker to do?  The obvious, of course.  Clean up all your social profiles.  That means no controversial content:  No party pics, no offensive political posts and no negativity.  Employers want to hire happy people!

In addition to keeping it clean, make sure your profile is up-to-date with your current work status and accurate title.  And speaking of, leverage all of those coveted contacts of yours.  Social media isn’t just a gold mine of data for advertisers.  Review your connection’s job titles and places of work and message those who may know of an opportunity that’s right for you.

11.  Volunteer

If you can swing it, volunteering is an excellent way to get a job.  Aside from it complimenting the rest of your experience on your resume, you can actually acquire new skills and knowledge as a volunteer.  And if that’s not enough, a study by the Corporation for National and Community Service found that those who volunteered had a 27% better chance of finding a job than those who didn’t.

12.  Connect with Alumni

If you attended a college or university you should have access to some sort of alumni network. Many universities have local chapters all over the country and are great assets in the job hunt.  School pride runs deep and those involved in alumni networks are on a mission to help as many fellow alumnus as possible.  If you can’t seem to find an alumni chapter near you, LinkedIn is a great alternative where you can search professionals who went to the same school as you.

13.  Connect with Former Teachers

We all have that one favorite teacher who really left an impression on our lives. But did you make one on theirs?  This may sound way out on left field, but if you’re still living near your old school, it wouldn’t hurt to reach out to your former teachers to see if they can help.  When you’re in the job market, it’s best to leave no stone unturned.  The more people who can help you find a job, the better.  Besides, it’s usually not acceptable to include a former teacher as a reference in job applications.  But if you have one that thinks the world of you, it’s likely they’ll offer whatever help they can in finding you a job.

14.  Get Creative

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When all else fails you just might have to get a little creative.  We’ve seen a variety of ‘extreme’ job search methods used by job seekers over the years. From Nina Mufleh’s online resume that earned her an interview with Airbnb, to Adam Pacitti’s billboard that received over 100 job offers, there’s no limit to the creativity that can be used to get the job you want and deserve.  Shoot, (pardon the upcoming pun), we even came across a photographer who sent out 400 action figures of himself just to make his work known.  My point is, if you’re passionate enough, you’re creative enough.  If you feel stuck in a rut and just need to be heard, try doing things differently.  You just might get the results you’re looking for.

Got any job search techniques we missed?  Add them in the comments below.  Like this article? Share if with your friends.  Thanks for reading!

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The Art of the Job Search – Digital and In-Person Networking

This week, we begin a new series entitled “The Art of the Job Search.” Each week, we will discuss topics job seekers face in their job hunt, and will provide some useful information for employers looking for their next hire as well. Our first installment in this new series will focus on networking – both digitally and in person.

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As you begin or continue your job search, you may be spending your time searching and applying for jobs that match your experience and ideal career goals. While these are important steps in any job search, building relationships with people in your preferred industries is also important. According to a report by U.S. News & World Report,* some statistics show as much as 80% of new hires were based off referrals within the company. In this digital era, job seekers and recruiters alike must capitalize on
both in-person and online networking opportunities to build those relationships.

These days, digital channels are great ways to reach new industry contacts and obtain networking advice before you meet face-to-face. With social media sites as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google+, you have the ability to search for hiring managers in companies you’re interested in and what events offer the opportunity to meet them.

Some quick tips for digital networking include:

  • Search for hiring managers and other key staff at a company’s social pages including their own website. Connect with hiring managers on as many channels as possible to build that relationship.
  • Be sure your resume includes any professional networking links, including LinkedIn and your professional blog if you have one.
  • Likewise, be sure to hyperlink your resume to your social networking sites. If you are not currently employed, let people know you’re looking through posts including your resume.
  • Complete all stages of each social media profile. For example, completed LinkedIn profiles appear higher in search engine results. These searches are another way hiring managers research a potential employee before meeting with them.
  • Join the conversation for your desired industries on Twitter’s industry chats and LinkedIn Groups. You not only stay on top of the latest industry news, but you will receive priceless tips from people working in your field. Your contributions to the group may be noticed by a hiring manager ready to meet you!

One of the goals of digital networking efforts is to land the face-to-face meeting with the industry contact. Some of the places to network include job fairs, Chamber of Commerce meetings, and industry events. Some great sites exist that may help you find industry events in your area, including Facebook, LinkedIn Groups, Eventful and MeetUp.

After you network in-person, it is best to always be the person who follows up. Never assume a contact will reach out to you. Instead, be proactive and ask for a business card or contact information, as well the method they prefer to stay in touch. After the meeting, be sure to send a follow up email or make a call to keep the communication flowing. Your contact may have spoken to a great many people at a single event, and this is a great way for your discussion to stay fresh in their memory.

As you control your digital presence and utilize more networking tools online, you will be set above the crowd, helping you land the coveted face-to-face meeting sooner!

* U.S. News & World Report, “Tips to Succeed With In-Person Networking,” January 2013

Photo credit: evenbrite.com