Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on Jobs

Clinton and Trump have distinctive plans to bring back jobs

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump shared their views on what it will take to create new jobs during last night’s presidential debate.

Last night Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump faced off in their final presidential debate. Jobs and the candidate’s plans for creating them were one of the hot topics discussed.

Like most issues, Clinton and Trump have two different views on what it will take to bring jobs back to the U.S.  Since it can be hard to hear through all the name calling and low blows we decided to break down each candidate’s ideas for job growth.

To keep things civil we’ll lay out the former first lady’s plans first.

Hillary Clinton’s Jobs Plan

Mission:  Making the Largest Investment in Good-Paying Jobs Since World War II

# Jobs created:  10.4 million jobs in the first term alone

The Plan:  

Throughout her campaign Clinton has promised to invest in the country’s youth as well as education.  Beginning with a $20 billion initiative Clinton is aiming to create new jobs specifically for millenials.  Within the initiative lies a $1,500 tax credit for employers that create apprenticeships. This credit will increase for employers that bring on young adults.

Clinton believes that student debt is preventing millenials from contributing to our economy.  She is committing to create a program that lets anyone with a college loan to refinance and enroll in income-based repayments.  She’s also pledging to make community college free, while enabling working families to continue their education with free tuition at public four-year-colleges.

Clean energy is also a priority for Clinton.  She vows to install half a billion solar panels by the end of her first term.  If she can set out to achieve these goals, there will be jobs created in the renewable energy sector.

She wants to do more to support small business. While her website points out that she is to “cut taxes, reduce red tape, and support innovation so that small businesses can grow and hire,” it’s not entirely clear how she will do this.  Though, It’s worth noting she wants young entrepreneurs to be able to defer their loans without payments or interest for up to three years to help them get their businesses off the ground.

Supporting scientific research and technological innovation are also on the agenda for the former Secretary. Clinton believes new industries will be created by investing in the two.

America’s infrastructure is another area Clinton wants to invest in. The repairing of roads, bridges, and schools, for example, will create jobs in a variety of industries.

Last but not least, Clinton wants to invest in American manufacturing.  She plans on encouraging U.S. companies to keep jobs on our soil by charging companies that move overseas an “exit tax”. She also wants to enforce companies to “pay us back” when they take tax breaks as well as hire overseas workers. 

On the subject of trade, Clinton wants to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership as it does not put U.S. job creation first.

While Clinton’s well rounded jobs plan sounds promising, it does come at a cost. How will she pay for this elaborate plan exactly?  Tax hikes on the wealthy. For example, Clinton’s proposed tax plan includes a new tax bracket for those making $5 million and over.

Critics of her tax plan have some serious concerns.  They fear her proposal to raise the business investment tax rates will kill jobs, reduce wages and hurt the economy. 

But whether you agree with Clinton’s jobs plan or not, any tax plan changes must get passed by Congress.  Which leads us to…

Donald Trump’s Jobs Plan

Mission:  To be the Greatest Jobs President God Ever Created

# Jobs Created:   25 million in next decade

The Plan:

Donald Trump’s job creation plan is based on his pro-growth economic policy.  It begins with a completely revised tax plan that cuts rates for everyone.  Trump proposes that the current seven tax brackets be reduced to just three with anyone making $29,000 a year or less paying nothing at all.

His tax plan also includes a lowering of the business tax.   Trump believes companies will want to keep business in the U.S. by reducing the business tax rate from 35% to 15%.

More elements of Trump’s tax plan include the closing of special interest tax breaks, the elimination of the carried interest loophole for Wall Street and a child care deduction.

The reform of government regulations is another component of Trump’s plan to bring back jobs.  He wants agency and department heads to identify all job killing regulations.  Any that are not compelled by Congress or public safety will be removed.

To be specific, Trump gives examples such as the Waters of The U.S. Rule and the EPA’s Clean Power Plan.  Both would be wiped out under Trump’s presidency.

Trump is pledging an America-first trade policy.  He believes the fastest way to bring back America’s lost manufacturing jobs is to renegotiate our current trade deals.   For example, he is adamant about renegotiating NAFTA and wants to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership entirely.  

Trump has also been extremely vocal about putting an end to the abuse of trade agreements.  He will have China labeled as a currency manipulator.  In the event China does not stop its illegal trade activities, Trump will use every lawful presidential power to resolve trade disputes and apply tariffs.

The final piece of Trump’s jobs plan revolves around energy production.  Trump wants the U.S. to not only be energy independent, but become the world’s leader in this field.  He wants to lift current restrictions on all sources of energy including coal and onshore and offshore oil and gas.

Trump will also support hydraulic fracturing, and allow energy production on federal lands. By lifting the existing energy restrictions, Trump estimates over 500,000 new jobs will be added annually.

With vastly different views from his opponent, Trump’s plans to reform tax, trade, energy and regulatory policies are his plans to create new jobs. The Trump campaign’s economist estimates that the economy will see a boost under his plan, ultimately creating 25 million jobs over the next decade.

However, critics of the dubbed “Trump Economy” fear that while he may create jobs in the short-term, the federal debt created from his tax plan could slow job-creation down over the next decade.

Remember, any changes to tax policy have to get passed through Congress.  While the subject of Congress passing laws is a controversial one, it is important to stay informed on who’s running for the Senate and what they stand for.  After all, the Congressional election is on November 6th as well.  If you’re unsure as to whether Clinton or Trump can produce jobs, you still have the power to vote for your congressman or congresswoman!

 Editor’s Note:  This article contains the highlights of each of the candidate’s jobs plans.  You can find their full plans for job creation on their campaign websites.

Sources:  https://www.hillaryclinton.com/briefing/factsheets/2016/08/08/hillary-clintons-jobs-plan-for-millennials/

https://www.donaldjtrump.com/press-releases/fact-sheet-donald-j.-trumps-pro-growth-economic-policy-will-create-25-milli

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/briefing/factsheets/2016/08/01/hillary-clintons-100-day-jobs-plan/

http://taxfoundation.org/sites/default/files/docs/TaxFoundation-FF496.pdf

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/jul/28/hillary-clintons-bad-tax-plan/

http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/2015/06/16/donald-trump-will-be-greatest-jobs-president-god-ever-created.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-37013670

http://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/2016/06/28/trumps-7-steps-to-bring-back-u-s-jobs.html

http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-10-17/trump-tax-plan-seen-adding-jobs-then-costing-them-long-term

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The Art of the Job Search – Always Be Looking

You may have heard the phrase “Always Be Learning.” To be the best you can be, in your professional and personal life, this certainly holds true. We can and should always be learning. Learning doesn’t cease just because we receive a degree or reach a certain age. We can always learn more about our surroundings and others.

There is another phrase to follow in life – Always Be Looking. If the recession and economic uncertainty of past years taught us one thing, it could be that we never know the real security of our jobs and lifestyles. One day we can have it all, and the next day be forced to look for a new opportunity. While the shock of being laid off or having our companies close cannot be lessened through preparation, we should always be learning and looking. Looking for other opportunities in our field, or in other fields, and keeping our options open.

Know Where Your Industry is Going. Are the number of job opportunities growing in your field, or are positions like yours disappearing? By constantly looking for job opportunities, you can spot trends, gain the education you need, and be proactive in your career.

Give Yourself Goals. Research jobs you would want down the road. If you are in college or a training school, look for positions you would want to apply to after graduation. If you are in a field and want to move up (and who doesn’t), look at the descriptions and requirements of those jobs that would appeal to you in 1 year, 5 years, or more. Create a path to success by gaining the education and experience needed for those positions.

Create a Game Plan for a Worst-Case Scenario. If you lost your job next week, what would be your first steps? By regularly researching the types of jobs available in your field, and the companies where you would want to work, you would have knowledge of where to begin your next aggressive job search.

Job.com is a job board with a focus of putting America Back to Work. If you are ready to continue (or begin) your resolution to Always Be Looking, visit our site to conduct tailored job searches and research tools available to reach employers and recruiters across the nation. As always, the Job.com team wishes you success!

The Art of the Resume – What to Include (and What to Leave Out)

ImageToday’s resume must meet the qualifications of, at minimum, two different audiences. The goal is to get the resume into the hands of a hiring manager or recruiter – someone who must be interested in the content of your resume to consider you for their position. Before the resume ever makes it into that person’s hands, however, it is becoming more and more likely that it must first pass through an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). This software is being used by many employers to filter through resumes and pass along only the most relevant to the hiring manager. How do you make sure your resume passes both tests? These checklists are good places to start.

What To Include:

  • Proper formatting – Include defined sections (such as “Education”) and bullet point lists so your resume is easy to read.
  • Correct spelling and grammar – Constantly proofread your resume after every edit, and get a fresh set of eyes to look over your resume as well to catch anything you might miss.
  • Uniform font type and size – The entire resume should be the same font, and headings or section titles should stand out in larger text than the bullet point lists. Your contact information should be the largest, easiest text to find.
  • Keywords – Pass the ATS test with keywords that match the description for the job to which you are applying. Include the industry-specific keywords you know the employer will be looking for from their ideal candidate. For instance, an HVAC professional might include their NATE or RSES certifications.
  • Contact information – Include your most recent phone number(s), a professional sounding email address, and your physical address. If you have a digital media page that showcases your qualifications or professional accomplishments, such as a LinkedIn page or website, include the link.
  • Professional Pitch – Where everyone used to include an objective in their resume, you can provide a quick pitch to “wow” potential employers to read your entire resume.
  • Education and Work Experience – Include the relevant training, certifications or degrees, and the relevant work experience you received that can be applied to the position. Your experience can be listed as a series of accomplishments, rather than just your job responsibilities in each position. For instance, an office manager may have “developed a digital filing system” for their office, as opposed to listing that they “moved all physical records to a digital format.”

What to Leave Off:

  • Third-Party Voice or Unnecessarily Big Words – Your resume should read in the same conversational and approachable tone you would use in an interview.
  • Polarizing Interests or Hobbies – Remember the person reading your resume may not share your enthusiasm or viewpoints on certain topics. If it doesn’t pertain to the job for which you are applying, don’t include it on your resume.
  • Irrelevant Experience – Only include the education or experience that can be used to the benefit of your potential employer in your bullet point lists.
  • Contact Information from Your Current Employer – Never include your work email or phone number as the means to reach you.
  • Lies – If you lack a specific certification or work experience, focus instead on the skills you do possess.

The Art of the Resume – What Format to Use?

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As a part of our ongoing job seeker series “The Art of the Job Search,” we’ve created a series of tips regarding resume writing and promotion. The first installment in the resume series discusses the various formats you can use, depending on the type of position for which you are applying.

Being a job seeker can be a full time job. First, you research your target industries and find the companies you feel would be the best fit. You network with employees at those companies, attend job fairs, and search job boards to see what types of jobs are in demand. For all the work you do, is your resume helping or hurting you? Think of your cover letter and resume as your personal marketing pieces – what the employer will reference again and again when considering you for their company. Does your resume encompass all that you can offer? Does it stand out from the crowd?

The first thing to consider when creating or redoing your resume is the format. Different formats can be used to accomplish certain career goals. The traditional resume formats include chronological, functional, and a combination of both.

The chronological format lists your education and experience in order, most recent first. You can use this format when you want a position in your current industry, you have extensive experience, or you can demonstrate upward movement in your positions. These factors prove you are ready for the next step in your career.

The functional format revolves around accomplishments in your career. Use this format when you want to make a career change and feel your experience could be used in a new industry, if you have held many different jobs in a short period of time, or you are returning to work after long absence.

The combination format presents your relevant skills in chronological order. This format can be used whether you want to move to a new industry or remain in your current field. The combination format is also a good option when you have gaps in employment, want to express how your skills in other types of work, such as volunteering, can be transferred to the position, or when your past job titles do not encompass all of your responsibility in that position. 

Regardless of the format you select, it is most important to tailor your resume to the position for which you are applying. As you look over your experience, does it mirror the qualifications required in the posting?

Here are some general formatting tips to leave the employer ready to learn more after reading your resume.

  • Make sure your resume is easy to read with clearly defined sections (Education, Experience, etc.) and bullet point lists of responsibilities and accomplishments.
  • Include proper spelling and grammar, double check that all text is in the same font, and that there are distinct heading and bullet point list sizes. Your name and contact information should be the largest font for quick recognition.
  • Demonstrate all relevant training in your Education section. Do you have a certification the employer would be interested in seeing?
  • Along with your responsibilities in each job you include, list accomplishments you feel could be applied to the position to which you are applying.
  • Have references ready upon request from the employer who can vouch for your experience and accomplishments.

Spring into the New Season with a New Job

ImageToday marks the first day of the renewing season of Spring.  Now is the perfect time to mirror your professional journey after nature, starting the season with a refreshed focus on achieving your career goals.

As the temperatures rise, here are a few industries that have increased their hiring.

Home Improvement Stores – Whether you want to turn to Big Box giants such as Lowe’s or Home Depot, or search for work at your local hardware store, now is the time to apply to their jobs.

Amusement and Theme Parks – Many parks located in Central and Eastern time zones reopen for the season between March and April so they’re going on massive hiring sprees now.

Lawn Care and Pest Control Services – Warmer weather means greener grass, flowers that bloom and all the critters that come with them.  That’s why now is a great time to find opportunities with companies like TruGreen, Terminix or Permatreat.

Hospitality, Leisure and Recreation – While hotels and vacation resorts are great places for work all year long, many popular hot spots are gearing up for summer vacation season throughout these cooler months. Look no further than your local area attractions to see who’s hiring, including your local Parks and Recreation Department.  Here you will find positions ranging from Athletic Coach and Events Manager, to Grounds Supervisor and Security Officer.

Don’t have a green thumb?  No problem!  Other top industries for jobs include: