Job Tips & News – Your Weekly Round Up

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The jobs are hot in these summer months

From an improving job market to talk of Google being the next big job board, this week’s round up is sure to leave you full of optimism and maybe even ice cream.

New Jobs Up By 287,000 in June

Non-farm jobs jumped by a surprisingly robust 287,000 in June, exceeding all but the most optimistic expectations. It was the second-largest jobs increase in a year and follows a month where new jobs grew by a paltry 11,000, down from an initial report of 38,000.

This morning’s report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics also said that unemployment ticked up from 4.7 percent to 4.9 percent, in part due to an influx of workers — many of them new grads — joining the labor force.

Some of June’s increase is due to the end of a Verizon strike that idled 35,000 workers, which the government counted as lost jobs in May. On the other side of the ledger, June’s numbers don’t reflect any impact from Britain’s vote to exit the Economic Union, a result that rocked the world’s economic markets. Any effect there won’t be known until the government issues its report for July’s employment.

Still, June’s numbers will help calm fears of a stalling jobs market. Except for softness in the oil and gas industry, and a 9,400 drop in transportation and warehousing, all major sectors showed job growth. The leisure and hospitality sector and healthcare had the largest increases. Seasonal recreation increases accounted for 27,200 jobs and bars and restaurants added another 21,900 workers. Healthcare grew by 38,500 jobs.

The private sector accounted for 265,000 of the new jobs, well above what economists were expecting and better, even, than what ADP reported Thursday in its National Employment Report.

A CareerBuilder forecast for the rest of this year predicts the second half will look a lot like the first half in terms of job growth. Based on a survey of 2,153 hiring and HR managers, CareerBuilder says:

50 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent workers, on par with 49 percent last year
29 percent of employers plan to hire part-time employees, on par with 28 percent last year
32 percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers, down slightly from 34 percent last year.

For the current quarter, 34 percent of the surveyed employers reported they plan to add full-time, permanent headcount, the same that said that last year.

One difference between the coming six months and the prior, says the CareerBuilder report, will be higher wages. About 40 percent of employers said they will pay higher starting salaries to new employees brought on in the next six months; 20 percent will pay at least 5 percent more. Current employees, too, will get a boost; 53 percent of employers said they plan raises for all workers before the end of the year.

That echoes what the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics data suggests may be the start of a general wage increase, long expected by economists. In its June report, the BLS said, average hourly earnings for all employees on private non-farm payrolls increased 2 cents to $25.61, following a 6-cent increase in May. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 2.6 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 4 cents to $21.51 in June.

This article first appeared on EREMedia.com

The Sweetest cities in the world

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More than 400 cities around the world share in the frozen fun.  See if your city is bringing treats to the streets.

U.S. & Canada

Albany, NY
Ann Arbor, MI
Asheville, NC
Atlanta, GA
Austin, TX
Baltimore, MD
Baton Rouge, LA
Beaumont, TX
Bellingham, WA
Birmingham, AL
Boise, ID
Boston, MA
Buffalo, NY
Central Atlantic Coast, FL
Charleston, SC
Charlotte, NC
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH
College Station, TX
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Dallas, TX
Delaware, MD
Denver, CO
Des Moines, IA
Detroit, MI
Edmonton, AB
El Paso, TX
Erie, PA
Fairfield County, CT
Fayetteville, NC
Fort Myers-Naples, FL
Gainesville, FL
Grand Rapids, MI
Hampton Roads, VA
Harrisburg, PA
Hartford County, CT
Honolulu, HI
Houston, TX
Indianapolis, IN
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Kitchener-Waterloo, ON
Lafayette, LA
Las Vegas, NV
Lawrence, KS
Lehigh Valley, PA
Little Rock, AR
London, ON
Los Angeles, CA
Louisville, KY
Madison, WI
Manhattan, KS
Maui, HI
Memphis, TN
Miami, FL
Milwaukee, WI
Minneapolis – St. Paul, MN
Mobile, AL
Montreal, QC
Myrtle Beach, SC
Nashville, TN
New Haven County, CT
New Jersey Shore
New Jersey
New London County, CT
New Orleans, LA
New York City, NY
Oklahoma City, OK
Omaha, NE
Orange County, CAOrlando, FL
Ottawa, ON
Pensacola, FL
Phoenix, AZ
Piedmont Triad, NC
Pittsburgh, PA
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Portsmouth, NH
Quebec City, QC
Raleigh-Durham, NC
Rhode Island
Richmond, VA
Sacramento, CA
Salt Lake City, UT
San Antonio, TX
San Diego, CA
San Francisco, CA
Sarasota, FL
Savannah-Hilton Head, GA
Seattle, WA
Spokane, WA
St Louis, MO
State College, PA
Tacoma, WA
Tallahassee, FL
Tampa Bay, FL
Topeka, KS
Toronto, ON
Utica, NY
Vancouver, WA
Washington, DC
Wichita, KS
Wilmington, NC

This announcement first appeared on Uber.com

Rumor Has It

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Google’s getting in to the job board game. Listen. It’s blasphemy here at the Job to
overly push another job site. After all, why send our seekers elsewhere when they can
access jobs from over 30 different career sites right on Job.com? Over 4 million searchable jobs and counting. But this news is so juicy the blogosphere has blown up with posts all week, and I’m feeling like Selena Gomez and can’t keep my news to myself. I mean I could, but why would I want to?!

Here’s the Scoop

An industry vet alerted everyone of the news after conducting a Google search for “aviation jobs”.   The search results revealed job snippets listed above all standard search results. The snippet was extracted from the site Aviation Week. Annnnnd that’s all we know.
Ok so there’s a little more to the story than that. Approximately 10 years ago the search giant had a product called Google Base in which they provided classified listings for anyone with “jobs” or “rent”, for example, in their search. The catch was that the information was limited to whatever anyone had uploaded into Google directly. This manual process proved to be too daunting for users, ultimately leading to the product’s demise.

Google, How Do You Plead?

Google’s taking the 5th on this one. But we found out about this on
the Internet and you know anything you read on the Internet is most certainly true. My take:It’s likely Google is testing out a classified product for jobs. Bear in mind Google tests a lot of things that never see the light of the day so time shall tell.

Check out one of the many articles we were inundated with this week to learn more>>

 

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